Microsoft lumia 650 black


Microsoft Lumia 650 review: Dress for less

The Lumia 950 and Lumia 950 XL provided the answer to the platform's fans starved for quality hardware and the complete flagship experience. The budget-friendly Lumia 550 that launched alongside didn't get as much attention, but served its purpose just fine - introducing the new Windows 10 to the masses.

Now, everyone will agree this is far from a complete lineup and, a few months later, Microsoft is ready to do something about it. The Lumia 650 is a gorgeous looking phone - we can't think of a better way to start filling the blanks.

It is amazing how much of a style difference a bit of metal can make. The Lumia 650 looks much more refined than any Lumia device to date (including the Nokia Lumia 830, which too flaunted a metal frame). Actually, we might as well go ahead and say it - the Lumia 650 looks better than its flagship siblings, the Lumia 950 and 950 XL.

So, if all that hotness is available for less than $200, what's the catch? To put it gently, the internals don't quite do justice to the classy exterior.

Key features

    • Windows 10 Mobile
    • Aluminum frame around polycarbonate body with an exchangeable back cover
    • Slim and surprisingly lightweight body
    • 5.0 inch OLED display with 720p resolution and 297ppi
    • Qualcomm Snapdragon 212 chipset, quad-core 1.3 GHz Cortex-A7, 1GB of RAM
    • 16GB of built-in memory
    • 8 MP, f/2.2, 28mm main camera with a single LED flash
    • 5 MP, f/2.2 front camera capable of 720p video recording
    • Cat. 4 LTE (150/50Mbps); Wi-Fi b/g/n; Bluetooth 4.1; GPS/GLONASS/BDS; microUSB
    • 2,000mAh battery capacity

Main disadvantages

    • Entry-level chipset
    • No 1080p video recording
    • Rather low battery capacity
    • No support for Windows 10 Continuum

A punchy AMOLED screen does wonders for the overall impression - it's a Windows phone after all with plenty of black throughout the UI - and that's actually not where the good stuff ends. A solid 16GB of inbuilt storage is good enough to get you started and for everything else, there's a memory card slot. A fairly wide selfie camera is on the plus side as well.

Unfortunately, the product team didn't have much budget left after these had to resort to using entry-level hardware, which has resulted in a rather unbalanced end product. It's not that the raw processing power is not enough - Windows smartphones are known to be quite frugal. But the choice of chipset has limited other aspects of the phone experience - the absence of 1080p video recording is one of them.

Microsoft Lumia 650 in official photos

Obviously, LTE support was a higher priority than high-res video for the intended markets and demographics. Anyway, the compact and sturdy Lumia 650 will certainly get a lot of attention from budget-conscious users.

We'll have a look at what you will be getting with the Lumia 650 on the following pages. This review is a little shorter than usual but hopefully sharp and to the point.

Page 2

There is no denying that the Lumia 650 is a really gorgeous phone and in a very non-Lumia way, not necessarily appealing to traditional Lumia design fans. It really looks like the 650 isn't exactly related to any other offers in Microsoft's current lineup, like the Lumia 950 or 550. It is rather in a league of its own - slick, slim, light elegant, with just a touch of metal. Rounded corners and sloping edges have given way to a lot straighter and sharper lines and colorful, glossy plastic is nowhere to be found, just a black or white, mat finish all around.

This new push towards a more serious, business exterior seems to be an ongoing Microsoft trend, as it tries to move its lineup, or at least parts of it, away from the youthful approach, but the Lumia 650 really takes it to the next level.

Clean front side

We keep raving about the metal frame and we mean every word of it. It runs all the way along the sides of the device and has a dark steel finish, combined with shining silver edges on the front and back. Even the power and volume buttons on the right side are made of metal.

Of course, it's not all sunshine and roses. The shiny surface of the frame is split at two spots - by the 3.5 audio jack on the top of the unit and the microUSB port on the bottom. These two are surrounded by regular plastic and are an eye-sore.

A soft finish plastic back and nicely made insides with metal plates

The Lumia 650 is not only flaunts the metal proudly, but also combines it with a slim profile, measuring only 142 x 70.9 x 6.9 mm. Despite the thin waist line, the Lumia 650 still has a removable back cover that grants access to the 2000mAh battery pack. This is one of the few drawbacks of the design, as it did leave very little room for power cells. The strive for a lightweight body didn't help either, but the results speak for themselves - at 122 g, the Lumia 650 feels almost unnaturally light.

Metal all around, sadly, minus the ports

As for build quality and choice of materials, it is a mixed bag. We really can't complain about the plastic either. The front of the device has a really deep piano black or pure white finish that both work great with the OLED display. And as for the back, It is extremely thin and with a soft-touch finish, also quite flexible, but it appears pretty rigid once it's on the phone.

The only real complaint we have with the build quality is the way the back cover attaches to the back of the unit, which leaves a few gaps here and there. But, that just seems like nitpicking, considering the overall excellent picture.

Microsoft Lumia 650 in hand • The retail box • The phone ships with a 2.75W charger (5V, 0.55A)

Display

OLED panels are far from a novelty in the Lumia realm, but it is always a welcome sight to see the technology in a budget-friendly handset. With a current asking price of a little over $200, we wouldn't exactly call the Lumia 650 an entry-level device, but it is a solid mid-ranger, which should be its true place in the lineup, considering the Lumia 950 and the Lumia 550 on either side.

Going by this logic, it is great to see that Microsoft has managed to keep the OLED technology from the higher tier and leave it in the Lumia 650, giving it a clear neck up from its lower-end sibling. It also makes sense if we consider the handset as a spiritual successor to the Lumia 640. The 5.0-inch panel is nice and bright and also visually quite sharp, despite its 720p resolution.

As for the panel itself, it is decent albeit quite old, as it is of the Pentile variety. Maximum brightness is only average and the minimum white brightness is a little high for our taste. Sunlight legibility, on the other hand, is excellent. Color accuracy on the unit is surprisingly good, as well, so it has that going for it. Contrast, of course, is infinite thanks to the OLED technology, which is able to turn off the black completely.

Display test 100% brightness
Black, cd/m2 White, cd/m2 Contrast ratio
Microsoft Lumia 650 0.00 333
Microsoft Lumia 950 0.00 328
Microsoft Lumia 950 (max auto) 0.00 626
Microsoft Lumia 950XL 0.00 335
Microsoft Lumia 950XL (max auto) 0.00 705
Microsoft Lumia 550 0.57 546 963
Microsoft Lumia 640 0.49 508 1034
Nokia Lumia 735 0.00 363
Nokia Lumia 930 0.00 347
Huawei P8lite 0.45 362 802
Samsung Galaxy A3 0.00 470
Xiaomi Redmi Note 3 (MediaTek) 0.42 403 953
ZTE Blade S6 0.46 457 946
Moto G 3rd gen max manual 0.43 430 1009
Moto G 3rd gen max auto 0.53 539 1017
Meizu m2 note 0.42 473 1108

Sunlight contrast ratio

  • Samsung Galaxy S6 edge+ 4.615
  • Samsung Galaxy S7 edge 4.439
  • Samsung Galaxy S7 4.376
  • HTC One A9 4.274
  • Samsung Galaxy A3 4.241
  • Samsung Galaxy S6 edge 4.124
  • Samsung Galaxy Note5 4.09
  • Huawei Nexus 6P 4.019
  • OnePlus X 3.983
  • Oppo R7s 3.964
  • Samsung Galaxy A7 (2016) 3.918
  • Samsung Galaxy A5 3.895
  • Samsung Galaxy J7 outdoor 3.879
  • Samsung Galaxy J2 outdoor 3.873
  • Samsung Galaxy A8 3.859
  • Apple iPhone 6 3.838
  • Microsoft Lumia 950XL 3.837
  • Samsung Galaxy A9 (2016) 3.817
  • Motorola Moto X (2014) 3.816
  • Samsung Galaxy A5 (2016) 3.789
  • Apple iPhone 6s 3.783
  • Meizu Pro 5 3.781
  • Microsoft Lumia 650 3.772
  • Vivo X5Pro 3.706
  • Samsung Galaxy A7 3.679
  • BlackBerry Priv 3.645
  • Nokia Lumia 930 3.567
  • Nokia Lumia 735 3.547
  • Apple iPhone 6s Plus 3.53
  • Microsoft Lumia 950 3.512
  • Oppo R7 Plus 3.499
  • Samsung Galaxy J7 3.422
  • Meizu MX5 3.416
  • Oppo R7 3.32
  • Samsung Galaxy J2 3.235
  • Motorola Moto X Play 3.222
  • Lenovo Vibe Shot 3.113
  • LG Nexus 5X 3.092
  • Huawei Mate S 3.073
  • Microsoft Lumia 640 XL 3.065
  • Apple iPhone 6 Plus 3.023
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 2.97
  • Huawei Mate 8 2.949
  • HTC One S 2.901
  • Sony Xperia Z5 2.876
  • Microsoft Lumia 550 2.851
  • Sony Xperia Z5 compact 2.784
  • LG V10 2.744
  • Xiaomi Redmi 3 2.735
  • Sony Xperia M5 2.69
  • Xiaomi Mi 4i 2.641
  • Xiaomi Mi 4c 2.574
  • Microsoft Lumia 640 2.563
  • Motorola Moto G 4G 2.546
  • Oppo F1 2.528
  • Sony Xperia Z5 Premium 2.525
  • Sony Xperia M4 Aqua 2.503
  • Motorola Moto G 2.477
  • Huawei G8 2.471
  • Sony Xperia Z 2.462
  • Huawei Honor 7 2.406
  • ZUK Z1 by Lenovo 2.382
  • HTC One E9+ 2.305
  • Alcatel One Touch Hero 2.272
  • Apple iPhone 4S 2.269
  • Lenovo Vibe K4 Note 2.254
  • Sony Xperia C5 Ultra 2.253
  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 3 (MediaTek) 2.249
  • Sony Xperia C4 Dual 2.235
  • Motorola Moto G (2014) 2.233
  • LG Nexus 5 2.228
  • Huawei P8 2.196
  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 2 2.166
  • HTC One X 2.158
  • LG Aka 2.145
  • Archos 50 Diamond 2.134
  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 2.119
  • Huawei P8lite 2.078
  • Moto G 3rd gen max manual 2.026
  • Sony Xperia E4g 1.972
  • ZTE Blade S6 1.927
  • BlackBerry Leap 1.892
  • Meizu m2 note 1.892
  • HTC Butterfly 1.873
  • ZTE Nubia Z9 mini 1.759
  • Sony Xperia U 1.758
  • Asus Zenfone Selfie 1.68
  • Motorola Moto E (2nd Gen) 1.675
  • ZTE Nubia Z9 1.659
  • Motorola Moto E 1.545
  • Sony Xperia M 1.473
  • Xiaomi Redmi 2 1.311
  • Sony Xperia C 1.283
  • Meizu MX 1.221

Battery Life

The Microsoft Lumia 650 packs a rather small 2000mAh battery. The Snapdragon 212 SoC, combined with the 720p OLED display both spell power efficiency, but oddly enough, the handset eats through the available charge quite quickly.

It only managed to get an overall endurance rating of 55 hours. This is still better than the 43 hours its Lumia 550 sibling managed to clock in, but sadly also quite a bit less than the 76 hours the Lumia 640 earned last year. However, the latter is understandable, considering the 500mAh difference in battery capacity and the drastically new OS.

The fact is that the higher-end Lumia 950 only scored 48 hours of endurance in out battery tests, despite its 3000mAh battery. The top-of-the-line Lumia 950 XL managed to ramp that up to 62 hours, but only through the use of an even bigger 3340mAh pack.

So we are inclined to point a finger at Windows 10. While ambitious, Microsoft's latest cross-platform OS effort is still far from optimized or stable. Don't get us wrong, it shows great promise and has really taken usability and the UX to a whole new level, which we will touch upon in the following section. However, despite the fact that the OS is now rolling out officially to all supported handsets, problems are still plentiful - especially from stability point of view.

We found ourselves having to restart the Lumia 650 on several occasions as it had frozen quite badly. On one occasion, we even had to go as far as removing the battery, which, frankly, isn't really acceptable on a mature mobile platform in 2016. All this considered, it is no wonder that battery usage is less than ideal, but hopefully, future optimization will patch most things up, in the otherwise very impressive Windows 10.

Make note that our proprietary score also includes a standby battery draw test, which is not featured in our test scorecard but is calculated in the total endurance rating. The battery testing procedure is described in detail in case you're interested in the nitty-gritties.

www.gsmarena.com

Rendered: First look at the Microsoft Lumia 650

Sometime in early 2016, likely between January and February, Microsoft is expected to announce a new lower-tier Windows Phone. According to our sources, the Lumia 650 (codename Saana) is being positioned as a low-cost business device for companies to mass deploy to their employees.

Windows Central has partnered with @PhoneDesigner to bring you these exclusive renders of the upcoming Lumia 650. The renders themselves are based on internal Microsoft slides for the phone. While these images are not official at least according to our sources, they are highly reflective of the final product.

Backstory

According to our reporting, the Microsoft Lumia 650 was initially cancelled with the Lumia 750 and Lumia 850 back in July 2015 following Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella's letter to employees.

However, just a week later the project's status was reversed. From our understanding, the device (known only as Saana at the time) went through a few redesign efforts to be marketed as Microsoft's business phone. The phone is expected to be sold en masse to companies looking for a low-cost, but capable Windows 10 Mobile solution and takes over for the Lumia 640.

The phone's new look does add a professional aesthetic when compared to the Lumia 640 and Lumia 640 XL, which were also positioned for business use by Microsoft back in early 2015.

While the Lumia 950 and Lumia 950 XL are placed as the top-tier Windows 10 Mobile devices, their $550 and $650 price points make bulk deployments unlikely. Nonetheless, with their support for Continuum both phones can easily be sold for mobile professionals who need max specifications.

Regarding specifications, the Lumia 650 is not a barnburner, but it does bring a new design language that is very reminiscent of earlier iPhone designs. With its chrome sides and thin profile, the Lumia 650 looks like a premium budget phone. The effect of the metal band is similar to adding a Mozo case to the Lumia 950, and it seems Microsoft has learned a bit from that design folly.

Lumia 650 Specifications (likely)

  • Windows 10 Mobile
  • Colors: Matte White or Matte Black
  • 5-inch 720p display
  • Snapdragon 212 processor
  • 1GB of RAM
  • 8GB of storage with micro SD expansion
  • 5MP front-facing camera; 8MP rear with LED flash
  • No wireless charging

Also, our latest information points to a change in regards to the processor. Our report initially suggested the Lumia 650 would support a Snapdragon 410 while other reports claimed a Snapdragon 210.

Interestingly enough, it may be the case that both reports are wrong, as we now hear the Lumia 650 will ship with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 212. The Quaclomm Snapdragon 212 features a quad-core ARM Cortex A7 CPU with a 1.3 GHz CPU, Adreno 304 GPU, and support for X5 LTE and 1080p Full HD video playback.

Additional modern features include support for Qualcomm Quick Charge 2.0, dual-SIM configurations, Bluetooth 4.1, NFC, HD Voice, and Wi-Fi calling.

Expected release

Microsoft is unlikely to announce the Lumia 650 at the 2016 Consumer Electronic Show (CES) in Las Vegas in early January. Microsoft typical eschews this event for announcements, instead letting their OEM partners have their moment. We expect a few OEM partners to showcase new Windows Phones this year.

Instead, Microsoft may opt for a low-key announcement on their own, or, more likely, something for Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. That event takes place between February 22 and February 25. Last year, Microsoft announced the Lumia 640 and Lumia 640 XL at that event making a repeat a possibility.

Additionally, we have heard that in the U.S., at least, one carrier – Cricket Wireless – will be taking stock of the device likely in April. Cricket was one of the first carriers to pick up the Lumia 640 in May 2015 ($129 at the time) making a Lumia 650 pickup a natural replacement. Other carriers are possible, however, at this time, we have no further information to add.

Special thanks to @PhoneDesigner who worked with us on this story on their renders. To see more of their work, please visit phonedesigner.eu and their Facebook page

More information

Microsoft Lumia 650 topic page, news and details

Microsoft Lumia 650 forums at Windows Central

www.windowscentral.com

Microsoft Lumia 650 review: Dress for less

There is no denying that the Lumia 650 is a really gorgeous phone and in a very non-Lumia way, not necessarily appealing to traditional Lumia design fans. It really looks like the 650 isn't exactly related to any other offers in Microsoft's current lineup, like the Lumia 950 or 550. It is rather in a league of its own - slick, slim, light elegant, with just a touch of metal. Rounded corners and sloping edges have given way to a lot straighter and sharper lines and colorful, glossy plastic is nowhere to be found, just a black or white, mat finish all around.

This new push towards a more serious, business exterior seems to be an ongoing Microsoft trend, as it tries to move its lineup, or at least parts of it, away from the youthful approach, but the Lumia 650 really takes it to the next level.

Clean front side

We keep raving about the metal frame and we mean every word of it. It runs all the way along the sides of the device and has a dark steel finish, combined with shining silver edges on the front and back. Even the power and volume buttons on the right side are made of metal.

Of course, it's not all sunshine and roses. The shiny surface of the frame is split at two spots - by the 3.5 audio jack on the top of the unit and the microUSB port on the bottom. These two are surrounded by regular plastic and are an eye-sore.

A soft finish plastic back and nicely made insides with metal plates

The Lumia 650 is not only flaunts the metal proudly, but also combines it with a slim profile, measuring only 142 x 70.9 x 6.9 mm. Despite the thin waist line, the Lumia 650 still has a removable back cover that grants access to the 2000mAh battery pack. This is one of the few drawbacks of the design, as it did leave very little room for power cells. The strive for a lightweight body didn't help either, but the results speak for themselves - at 122 g, the Lumia 650 feels almost unnaturally light.

Metal all around, sadly, minus the ports

As for build quality and choice of materials, it is a mixed bag. We really can't complain about the plastic either. The front of the device has a really deep piano black or pure white finish that both work great with the OLED display. And as for the back, It is extremely thin and with a soft-touch finish, also quite flexible, but it appears pretty rigid once it's on the phone.

The only real complaint we have with the build quality is the way the back cover attaches to the back of the unit, which leaves a few gaps here and there. But, that just seems like nitpicking, considering the overall excellent picture.

Microsoft Lumia 650 in hand • The retail box • The phone ships with a 2.75W charger (5V, 0.55A)

Display

OLED panels are far from a novelty in the Lumia realm, but it is always a welcome sight to see the technology in a budget-friendly handset. With a current asking price of a little over $200, we wouldn't exactly call the Lumia 650 an entry-level device, but it is a solid mid-ranger, which should be its true place in the lineup, considering the Lumia 950 and the Lumia 550 on either side.

Going by this logic, it is great to see that Microsoft has managed to keep the OLED technology from the higher tier and leave it in the Lumia 650, giving it a clear neck up from its lower-end sibling. It also makes sense if we consider the handset as a spiritual successor to the Lumia 640. The 5.0-inch panel is nice and bright and also visually quite sharp, despite its 720p resolution.

As for the panel itself, it is decent albeit quite old, as it is of the Pentile variety. Maximum brightness is only average and the minimum white brightness is a little high for our taste. Sunlight legibility, on the other hand, is excellent. Color accuracy on the unit is surprisingly good, as well, so it has that going for it. Contrast, of course, is infinite thanks to the OLED technology, which is able to turn off the black completely.

Display test 100% brightness
Black, cd/m2 White, cd/m2 Contrast ratio
Microsoft Lumia 650 0.00 333
Microsoft Lumia 950 0.00 328
Microsoft Lumia 950 (max auto) 0.00 626
Microsoft Lumia 950XL 0.00 335
Microsoft Lumia 950XL (max auto) 0.00 705
Microsoft Lumia 550 0.57 546 963
Microsoft Lumia 640 0.49 508 1034
Nokia Lumia 735 0.00 363
Nokia Lumia 930 0.00 347
Huawei P8lite 0.45 362 802
Samsung Galaxy A3 0.00 470
Xiaomi Redmi Note 3 (MediaTek) 0.42 403 953
ZTE Blade S6 0.46 457 946
Moto G 3rd gen max manual 0.43 430 1009
Moto G 3rd gen max auto 0.53 539 1017
Meizu m2 note 0.42 473 1108

Sunlight contrast ratio

  • Samsung Galaxy S6 edge+ 4.615
  • Samsung Galaxy S7 edge 4.439
  • Samsung Galaxy S7 4.376
  • HTC One A9 4.274
  • Samsung Galaxy A3 4.241
  • Samsung Galaxy S6 edge 4.124
  • Samsung Galaxy Note5 4.09
  • Huawei Nexus 6P 4.019
  • OnePlus X 3.983
  • Oppo R7s 3.964
  • Samsung Galaxy A7 (2016) 3.918
  • Samsung Galaxy A5 3.895
  • Samsung Galaxy J7 outdoor 3.879
  • Samsung Galaxy J2 outdoor 3.873
  • Samsung Galaxy A8 3.859
  • Apple iPhone 6 3.838
  • Microsoft Lumia 950XL 3.837
  • Samsung Galaxy A9 (2016) 3.817
  • Motorola Moto X (2014) 3.816
  • Samsung Galaxy A5 (2016) 3.789
  • Apple iPhone 6s 3.783
  • Meizu Pro 5 3.781
  • Microsoft Lumia 650 3.772
  • Vivo X5Pro 3.706
  • Samsung Galaxy A7 3.679
  • BlackBerry Priv 3.645
  • Nokia Lumia 930 3.567
  • Nokia Lumia 735 3.547
  • Apple iPhone 6s Plus 3.53
  • Microsoft Lumia 950 3.512
  • Oppo R7 Plus 3.499
  • Samsung Galaxy J7 3.422
  • Meizu MX5 3.416
  • Oppo R7 3.32
  • Samsung Galaxy J2 3.235
  • Motorola Moto X Play 3.222
  • Lenovo Vibe Shot 3.113
  • LG Nexus 5X 3.092
  • Huawei Mate S 3.073
  • Microsoft Lumia 640 XL 3.065
  • Apple iPhone 6 Plus 3.023
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 2.97
  • Huawei Mate 8 2.949
  • HTC One S 2.901
  • Sony Xperia Z5 2.876
  • Microsoft Lumia 550 2.851
  • Sony Xperia Z5 compact 2.784
  • LG V10 2.744
  • Xiaomi Redmi 3 2.735
  • Sony Xperia M5 2.69
  • Xiaomi Mi 4i 2.641
  • Xiaomi Mi 4c 2.574
  • Microsoft Lumia 640 2.563
  • Motorola Moto G 4G 2.546
  • Oppo F1 2.528
  • Sony Xperia Z5 Premium 2.525
  • Sony Xperia M4 Aqua 2.503
  • Motorola Moto G 2.477
  • Huawei G8 2.471
  • Sony Xperia Z 2.462
  • Huawei Honor 7 2.406
  • ZUK Z1 by Lenovo 2.382
  • HTC One E9+ 2.305
  • Alcatel One Touch Hero 2.272
  • Apple iPhone 4S 2.269
  • Lenovo Vibe K4 Note 2.254
  • Sony Xperia C5 Ultra 2.253
  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 3 (MediaTek) 2.249
  • Sony Xperia C4 Dual 2.235
  • Motorola Moto G (2014) 2.233
  • LG Nexus 5 2.228
  • Huawei P8 2.196
  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 2 2.166
  • HTC One X 2.158
  • LG Aka 2.145
  • Archos 50 Diamond 2.134
  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 2.119
  • Huawei P8lite 2.078
  • Moto G 3rd gen max manual 2.026
  • Sony Xperia E4g 1.972
  • ZTE Blade S6 1.927
  • BlackBerry Leap 1.892
  • Meizu m2 note 1.892
  • HTC Butterfly 1.873
  • ZTE Nubia Z9 mini 1.759
  • Sony Xperia U 1.758
  • Asus Zenfone Selfie 1.68
  • Motorola Moto E (2nd Gen) 1.675
  • ZTE Nubia Z9 1.659
  • Motorola Moto E 1.545
  • Sony Xperia M 1.473
  • Xiaomi Redmi 2 1.311
  • Sony Xperia C 1.283
  • Meizu MX 1.221

Battery Life

The Microsoft Lumia 650 packs a rather small 2000mAh battery. The Snapdragon 212 SoC, combined with the 720p OLED display both spell power efficiency, but oddly enough, the handset eats through the available charge quite quickly.

It only managed to get an overall endurance rating of 55 hours. This is still better than the 43 hours its Lumia 550 sibling managed to clock in, but sadly also quite a bit less than the 76 hours the Lumia 640 earned last year. However, the latter is understandable, considering the 500mAh difference in battery capacity and the drastically new OS.

The fact is that the higher-end Lumia 950 only scored 48 hours of endurance in out battery tests, despite its 3000mAh battery. The top-of-the-line Lumia 950 XL managed to ramp that up to 62 hours, but only through the use of an even bigger 3340mAh pack.

So we are inclined to point a finger at Windows 10. While ambitious, Microsoft's latest cross-platform OS effort is still far from optimized or stable. Don't get us wrong, it shows great promise and has really taken usability and the UX to a whole new level, which we will touch upon in the following section. However, despite the fact that the OS is now rolling out officially to all supported handsets, problems are still plentiful - especially from stability point of view.

We found ourselves having to restart the Lumia 650 on several occasions as it had frozen quite badly. On one occasion, we even had to go as far as removing the battery, which, frankly, isn't really acceptable on a mature mobile platform in 2016. All this considered, it is no wonder that battery usage is less than ideal, but hopefully, future optimization will patch most things up, in the otherwise very impressive Windows 10.

Make note that our proprietary score also includes a standby battery draw test, which is not featured in our test scorecard but is calculated in the total endurance rating. The battery testing procedure is described in detail in case you're interested in the nitty-gritties.

www.gsmarena.com

Microsoft Lumia 650 Smartphone Specifications and Price

Microsoft Lumia 650 is a low-end budget windows smartphone. The phone is available in SINGLE SIM and Dual SIM variants, claims “the smart choice for your business.”  It is a mid-range device which is more affordable than the Lumia 950 and 950 XL.

Check out Microsoft Lumia 650 full phone specifications, features, price and availability details below:

Microsoft Lumia 650 Smartphone Features

  • Super sharp HD OLED display.
  • Comes with battery saving technology.
  • Built for business.
  • 4G LTE support on Windows 10.
  • Big, thin and light in weight.

Microsoft Lumia 650 Specifications

The Lumia 650 smartphone runs Windows 10 out of the box over a 5 inch super AMOLED HD screen with clear black display and gorilla glass 3 protection, supporting 1280 x 720 pixels resolution. The handset is powered by 1.3GHz QUALCOMM Snapdragon 212 Quad-Core processor (Cortex-A7 CPU) coupled with Adreno 304 GPU.

There is 1GB RAM, 16GB of internal storage and micro SD card support of up to 200GB. The Handset weight (including battery) is 122 grams and thickness is 6.9mm.

As far as the cameras are concerned, the Microsoft Lumia 650 window 10 mobile packs an 8-megapixel primary camera (type 1/4 inch sensor, 28mm equiv. focal length, f/2.2 aperture) on the rear and a fixed focus 5-megapixel front shooter for selfies. Both cameras can shoot 720p videos @30fps.

The phone gets power from a 2000 mAh removable battery. It gives up to 16 hours of talk time on the 4G networks. The Key features of Lumia 650 are — 4G LTE, 3G, 2G, NFC, FM radio, GPS, WiFi and Bluetooth 4.1.

Microsoft Lumia 650 Price and Availablity

The new phone bristles with the functionality that enterprise customers might like—particularly built-in apps including Office and OneDrive.

Lumia 650 is priced at $199 only. In European markets, you can buy this phone in just USD $199.

In India, it will be available at the price tag of Rs 14,499/-

Microsoft Lumia 650 is available in black and white color schemes. If liked this handset then share it on social sites!

www.gadgetsloud.com

Microsoft Lumia 650 review: Sleek looks, low price

Update: Shortly after this review was published, the Lumia 650 received a software update which has improved the overall experience and eliminated some of the issues experienced during the review period. You can find out more in the software section of the review.

The Quick take

The Lumia 650 is a step forward in terms of design refinements, but it doesn't leap so far ahead on the inside as some might hope compared to its predecessor. This phone is very much an incremental iteration.

If you want a well put together phone, for £160 the Lumia 650 is certainly attractive. While the software still has many quirks (or bugs, depending on your outlook), and while there's nothing to knock your socks off aside from the outward style, it's a solid phone at a solid price.

  • Great-looking display
  • Design and construction is superb
  • Solid camera
  • Slim and almost unnaturally light
  • Can chug from time to time, especially in games
  • Far too much bezel on the front
  • Windows 10 Mobile still 'quirky'

Lumia 650 specifications

Category Specification
Operating System Windows 10 Mobile
Display 5-inchesHD (1280x720) AMOLED, ClearBlack
Rear Camera 8MPf/2.2 aperture

720p Video Recording

Front Camera 5MPStill image captureVideo call

Video recording

Processors Qualcomm Snapdragon 212 Quad-core1.3GHz
Memory & Storage RAM: 1GBInternal storage: 16GB (expandable up to 200GB)
Network GSM Bands: 850 MHz, 900 MHz, 1800 MHz, 1900 MHzLTE Bands: Band 1, Band 3, Band 7, Band 8, Band 20Wi-Fi: IEE 802.11 b/g/n
Sensors AccelerometerAmbient light sensor

Proximity sensor

Location A-GLONASSA-GPSCellular

Wi-Fi network positioning

Dimensions 6.9 x 142 x 70.9 mm
Ports Micro-USB
Battery 2000 mAh
Other NFCBluetooth 4.1

The Lumia 650 is gorgeous. There's nothing too radical about the design, literally all it took is a metal frame, but it works. It's easily the best looking Lumia in the current lineup. What's more remarkable, and also confusing, is that Microsoft went down this road with a cheap phone and not its all singing, all dancing flagship products.

This is how the Lumia 950 should have looked.

The rear of the phone is still plastic, and still removable, with the battery cover coming away from between the metal frame to reveal the important parts beneath. NanoSIM, microSD card slot and a removable 2000mAh battery. Unlike on the older Lumia 830, the removable panel is incredibly thin. It's very pliable, and houses the phone's NFC contacts.

When attached to the phone, the rear is completely flat, save for a slight hump where you find the camera. The Lumia 640 didn't have a camera hump, but the 650 is very much slimmer. And that's why we have one now. The phone is so slim that it was unavoidable.

What Microsoft has avoided in the Lumia 650 is any unsightly antenna lines breaking up that sleek metal frame. How? There are plastic inserts that surround both the charging port and the headphone jack. I think I prefer this, frankly, and there's a little added protection when you're poking around trying to plug in a microUSB cable in the dark. I've scratched many a metal phone in the past by dragging a charging cable around looking for its home.

This is how the Lumia 950 should have looked

One thing that's also worth highlighting early on is the choice of colors. The days of bright colored Lumia phones still seems to be a thing of the past, and the 650 comes in a predictable, perhaps boring even, black or white. I think the black one looks a lot better, mostly because the white one has a white front. A white rear with a black front would have been so much better.

But let's also consider Microsoft's apparent target audience for the Lumia 650. It's being touted as the business phone, the commodity item to be bought up by corporate IT departments. Those kind of customers aren't going to be impressed by a bright green phone. So maybe it makes a little sense. Maybe.

But the combination of the matte finish on the rear, dull metal frame and the black front on the one I have here makes for a very sleek, elegant even, smartphone.

Inside things are mostly good, too. You shouldn't expect a whole lot for a phone at this price point but we do at least get 16GB of internal storage this year. If you're making a cheap phone, 16GB should still be the baseline. There's no excuse for an 8GB smartphone. It's paired with 1GB of RAM which still seems to be fine for most purposes when using Windows 10 Mobile.

The processor choice has garnered a bit of negativity from the hardcore community, with a Snapdragon 212 being very much towards the lower end. But it's one of Qualcomm's newest quad-core chips for cheap phones and most of the time it does just fine. If you're thinking automatically this is a step down from the Lumia 640 because 2 is less than 4 (as in Snapdragon 400), then stop right there.

The phone lags too much playing casual, less intensive games

Most of the time there is nothing to complain about. I'm not going to say it's perfect, because it isn't, and it does chug a bit from time to time. Inside Out Thought Bubbles (don't judge) isn't exactly a graphical extravaganza, but the Lumia 650 lags way too much while playing it. General every day tasks are handled just fine, and you get the trademark smoothness in most parts of the operating system. The internal hardware does struggle at times though when things get more demanding.

Equally, this phone costs £160, so if you were expecting to crush some Overkill 3 on it and have a good time, then you're not looking in the right place.

There are also cameras on this phone, two of them to be precise. And they're not bad. You've got 8MP round the back and 5MP round the front. We'll cover the camera in more depth a little further along.

And finally, the display. As with Microsoft's other, new, cheap phone, the Lumia 550, the display is 'only' 1280x720 resolution. It's a little bigger than that on the 550 at 5 inches, but no less impressive to see on a cheap phone. It's got great colors, decent blacks and text is sharp enough to read without seeing fuzzy edges. It's also much less reflective than that found on the 550, with a much more pleasurable viewing experience overall.

It's a credit to Microsoft you get a great screen even at the low-end

You have to compromise somewhere when making a phone that meets this price point, but the display is the thing you spend the most time with. It continues to be a credit to Microsoft that even at the lower end you're getting a great screen to glue your eyes to.

The point I find myself at is one which has been said before of Microsoft's cheaper smartphones. The hardware to price ratio is extremely compelling. Most of the major boxes are ticked, and while performance does stutter and drop off at times, for the most part its business as usual.

Only this time, business as usual has a much better wrapper. The bright plastic of old has gone, and in has come a new, sleek, sophisticated look for the lower end. And I like it a lot.

Update: Shortly after this review was published the .164 operating system update was pushed to the Lumia 650 that seems to resolve the issues mentioned below. The hotspot feature seems to work as intended now, while crashes and freezes as a whole are now virtually gone. We felt it necessary to provide a brief update given how close the software came out to the review since it makes a good difference to the overall feel of the phone. It doesn't however, eliminate issues discussed in the hardware section, as sometimes you just need horsepower. The original text follows.

When I reviewed the Lumia 550 and came to the point in the tale where I had to talk software, things took a turn. The out of the box experience on that phone was pretty appalling. By any standards, the first hours and days were not a happy time.

So you'd forgive me for being a little cautious going into the Lumia 650. Once again, we're not dealing with a pre-release review model here, this is the real deal. A proper retail product, bought from a proper retail store.

Which means I get to see exactly what anyone reading this review would see upon buying the phone.

The good news is that things were much less painful, as I'd expect them to be at this point. Numerous updates have rolled out since I reviewed the 550, and Windows 10 Mobile is at least becoming less buggy with each one. There was still an OS update to install on the 650 after first setup, not to mention every single pre-installed app needed updating, too. Including the Store, and sadly updating a large volume of apps at once still seems to be a struggle.

The Lumia 650 has been my best experience so far with Windows 10 Mobile

But once into using it, the Lumia 650 has been my best overall experience of Windows 10 Mobile yet on any device.

There are still bugs, random times when things just freeze up completely and when trying to select photos the phone doesn't seem to have a clue what you're actually tapping on and gives a completely different picture. I would love for all the annoying quirks to have been ironed out by now, but I'm almost resigned to accepting it at this point. The worst bug I experienced personally was while trying to use the phone as a hotspot while out at Mobile World Congress. Most of the time I had to reboot the phone to establish a successful connection.

But, it's still the best overall experience I've had yet. Having used the Lumia 950 and 550 recently, too, I'm still comfortable in saying this about the Lumia 650.

Microsoft still has work to do, though. Its own apps frequently slow up on the 650, especially the Xbox app, and the Store remains something that needs a serious boost of adrenaline.

But when you're not fighting the remaining bugs, it's a smooth, mostly snappy experience. Consistent performance across all devices has been a Windows Phone trademark for a long time, and it's the same now we're up to Windows 10. The Lumia 950 will be faster, because horsepower, but the general experience on the much cheaper 650 is by no means a second class citizen by comparison.

Last year's Lumia 640 surprised us in having a camera that performed better than the price attached to the phone would have suggested. So then, reason enough to be cautiously optimistic for the 2016 release.

Around the back there's an 8MP shooter, and flipping around to the front you're capturing your glorious selfies at 5MP. The front camera actually stands out a fair bit when you're looking at the phone.

But here's the thing: Even folks buying a cheap phone nowadays want, and can get good cameras. And Microsoft, thankfully, seems to have delivered.

All of the images above were shot at the recent trip to MWC, which was a great chance to use it in mixed conditions. Outside in the Spanish sunshine, inside press conferences, low light, overcast and pointing at some mountains. With Rich Capture turned on all the time, the results are pretty good.

It does seem to produce images a little on the warm side sometimes, and a with a tad of over saturation. Equally that could also be Rich Capture getting a little crazy and could be relieved by using the manual white balance controls instead.

But the pictures look good. Nothing exemplar — it's still a £160 phone after all — but good. The only real area of disappointment is indoors in low light, such as late at night, when it falls apart pretty badly. But the Lumia 650 isn't alone in that regard. Much more expensive phones struggle just as much in these circumstances.

The front facing camera is pretty good, too. If you're a selfie aficionado, or even just someone who likes to look at the people they're talking to during calls, you'll be pleased with the results from the 5MP unit on the front of the 650. It won't make you look like me though, promise.

But what we've got is another surprisingly good performance in a cheap phone from Microsoft. At this price point having pictures this good isn't a given, but with the camera fast becoming one of the main selling points of any phone, it's an area that we're pleased hasn't been ignored in keeping the asking price low.

The bulk of my testing of the Lumia 650 took place during MWC in Barcelona. However, I was using a local SIM from Vodafone ES, so sketchy roaming performance hasn't factored in. And during that week of total chaos, using the phone as a hotspot and snapping photos all over the place, it always got me from leaving the apartment to coming back to it at the end of the day. By contrast, I had a OnePlus X with a 2525mAh battery in the other pocket that was roaming and it was usually dead before 3pm. And it wasn't being used as a hotspot at all.

The battery sailed through a hard day at Mobile World Congress without trouble

All day battery life is just fine, and it's been even easier to make it through the day when back in the UK on O2 and not using it as crazily. There is also the added bonus of the battery being removable, but as with the Lumia 550, that hinges on being able to actually buy a replacement battery. You'd expect to be able to, but still.

It's comforting that you shouldn't have to actively worry about conserving battery during the course of a regular day. The business crowd that it's apparently targeted at don't want to be running out right as an important call or email comes through before they leave the office. And the rest of us want to be able to get home and not need to carry a battery pack. Unless you're using the camera a lot or watching a bunch of Netflix videos on it, you should be fine.

Lumia 650 pricing

What Microsoft has with its Windows 10 Mobile lineup of new Lumia phones is a distinct price divide. You've got the Lumia 950 and 950 XL at the top, and then a long way below is the Lumia 650, then 550. The Lumia 650 is available now in select markets like the UK, priced at £160 from the Microsoft Store.

Deals are always to be found, though, and our unit was bought for £139.99 from Carphone Warehouse, though a new O2 SIM and £20 of pay-as-you-go credit was required along with it.

At this time there's no word on availability in places such as the U.S. or India.

Lumia 650: The bottom line

The Lumia 650 is a good, cheap Windows phone. It looks fantastic, has decent battery life and a camera that's still surprisingly good. It's a shame that the outward beauty hasn't been met with some raw performance inside, but that's just where we are right now. Microsoft's best looking phone is a £160 budget model.

The decision to change up the design a little is theirs to make, and the 650 benefits from it greatly. While its predecessor was a great phone, it was still just another box decked out in brightly colored plastic. The 650 is Lumia grown up. It's sleek, sophisticated, and it'll look great next to the suits of the business users Microsoft is hoping will be buying up this phone by the bucket full.

The 650 is Lumia grown up

For the average person buying a phone that costs this much, there's not a whole lot to dislike. It's pretty bad that casual games like Inside Out Thought Bubbles cause the phone to grind as badly as it does, but the core experience is generally good.

But the software still needs work. The Lumia 650 has behaved much better during my time with it so far than other new Windows 10 Mobile toting Lumias, but there's still moments you will pull your hair out. Not being able to have a working hotspot without rebooting every time I wanted to use it was mine.

Unless you obsess over hardware specs, the Lumia 650 is a fine phone for not a lot of money. If you do obsess over hardware specs, you're probably already looking elsewhere.

Should you buy the Lumia 650? Sure

This has been the easiest new Windows 10 Mobile phone to recommend to buyers. If it fits your budget and you want a phone that looks great and will perform well enough for most things, give it a shot. It's not perfect, not at all, but it's been the least frustrating new Lumia since the updated operating system hit.

You do still need to be prepared to take a little risk with Windows 10 Mobile though, especially because of the remaining quirks. It's better than it was when we reviewed the Lumia 550, but there are still moments.

Where to buy the Lumia 650

Availability is still pretty limited right now. If you're in a position to buy from the UK, both the Microsoft Store and Carphone Warehouse will be able to help you out. If you find any particularly good deals anywhere, be sure to drop them into the comments below!

  • See at Microsoft
  • See at Carphone Warehouse

We may earn a commission for purchases using our links. Learn more.

www.windowscentral.com

Microsoft Lumia 650 Review | Trusted Reviews

Sections

Pros

  • Great design
  • Bright and sharp screen
  • Removable battery

Cons

  • Woefully underpowered
  • Middling camera
  • Windows 10 mobile still not perfect

Key Specifications

  • Review Price: £160.00
  • Windows 10 mobile
  • OLED display
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 212 CPU
  • 2,000mAh removable battery
  • 8-megapixel rear camera

2015 was the year of the affordable smartphone. During that time, we saw the release of some of the best value-for-money handsets ever made. Highlights included the Moto G, OnePlus X and Vodafone Smart Ultra 6.

These stellar devices offered up a variety of great features and technologies normally seen on phones up to twice their price, but they have a single unifying factor – they all run using Google’s Android OS.

With Apple having snubbed the market once again, unveiling its £359 iPhone SE mere days ago, it has left buyers on a budget with no real choice when it comes to software. Enter the Lumia 650, an affordable Windows 10 handset that Microsoft is aiming at enterprise, small-business and bring-your-own-device (BYOD) users.

On paper, the smartphone ticks all the right boxes, coming loaded with a suite of Office applications and an impressive OLED screen. But its overall appeal is diminished somewhat by the inclusion of a sub-par processor.

Video: Trusted explains buying a new smartphone

Microsoft Lumia 650 – Design

142 x 70.9 x 6.9mm, 122g

Outside of the OnePlus X, even the best affordable smartphones still look a little cheap, especially when compared to beautiful flagship units such as the Galaxy S7 and iPhone 6S.

Which is why I have to tip my hat to Microsoft for the Lumia 650’s design. The phone has a removable soft-touch plastic rear that sits in a premium-feeling metal frame. Physical volume and power buttons can be found along the Lumia 650’s long right side, with a micro-USB on its bottom edge and a 3.5mm headphone jack on top.

The combination of metal and plastic gives the Lumia 650 a far more expensive feel, so it was encouraging to discover that having accidentally drop-tested the phone on Trusted Reviews’ carpeted floor, the Lumia 650 survived unblemished. The metal frame and Gorilla Glass front were chip-free, and unlike many phones with removable backs, the Lumia 650’s plate stayed connected to the handset’s main body.

The detachable rear grants access to the Lumia 650’s removable battery and microSD card slot, which lets you add a further 200GB to the phone’s fairly basic 16GB of internal storage. But be warned: because Windows 10 Mobile doesn’t have an equivalent feature to Android Marshmallow’s adoptable storage, using an SD card – particularly a cheap one – will impact the phone’s performance.

The Lumia 650 is reasonably compact for a 5-inch phone. The small bezel and 6.9mm thickness result in a phone that’s comfortable to hold and use one-handed.

Microsoft Lumia 650 – Display

5-inch, 720p, OLED

The 5-inch display is pretty decent by affordable phone standards. Some screen-buffs will quibble over the fact it’s only 720p, but outside of a few exceptions – such as the Vodafone Smart Ultra 6 – there aren’t many budget phones that have made the jump to 1080p, and so the resolution is more than forgivable.

The screen looks reasonably sharp and text is universally legible. There are certain applications that look slightly fuzzy, but I’m guessing this is because their developers haven’t upped the UIs and resolution of icons; not because there is an issue with the screen.

Related: Best Affordable Smartphones The use of OLED screen tech also ensures colours look suitably punchy, enhanced further by the display’s deep black levels. The colours are slightly overcooked for my taste, but I know that many people prefer their screens to be calibrated this way – and it’s not like you’re going to be editing photos on the Lumia 650.

The device’s maximum brightness is solid, too, and matches – if not beats – competing affordable phones such as the Moto G. Viewing angles are also nicely wide.

My only issue with the screen is that whites aren’t the cleanest I’ve seen, having a slight yellow tinge. However, this is understandable when you consider the Lumia 650’s low price.

Deputy Editor

After graduating from King’s College London, Alastair started his career covering government technology policy and cyber security at The International Business Times. He later joined Incisive Media as…

Unlike other sites, we thoroughly test every product we review. We use industry standard tests in order to compare features properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. We never, ever accept money to review a product. Tell us what you think - send your emails to the Editor.

www.trustedreviews.com


Смотрите также