Lenovo yoga 300


Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBR Convertible Review

Bad display choice? Lenovo's 11.6-inch convertible fails to impress in any given area - but it stands out in a negative way with its TN panel and limited viewing angle stability.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Indian citizens welcome!

Currently wanted: News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Processor

Memory

4096 MB  , DDR3-1600, Dual-Channel, soldered on

Display

11.6 inch 16:9, 1366 x 768 pixel, capacitve, AU Optronics B116XTN02.3, TN LED, glossy: yes

Storage

Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive, 500 GB  , 5400 rpm, 390 GB free

Soundcard

Realtek HD Audio

Connections

2 USB 2.0, 1 USB 3.0 / 3.1 Gen1, 1 HDMI, 1 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: Audio combo-jack, Card Reader: SD, Brightness Sensor, Sensors: Brightness sensor, acceleration sensor, TPM 2.0

Networking

Realtek RTL8168/8111 Gigabit-LAN (10/100/1000/2500/5000MBit/s), Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 3160 (a/b/g/n = Wi-Fi 4/ac = Wi-Fi 5), Bluetooth 4.0

Size

height x width x depth (in mm): 21.8 x 299 x 209 ( = 0.86 x 11.77 x 8.23 in)

Operating System

Microsoft Windows 10 Home 64 Bit

Additional features

Speakers: Stereo, Keyboard: Chiclet, Keyboard Light: no, Lenovo Photo Master, McAfee LiveSafe-Internet Security (trial), MS Office (trial), 12 Months Warranty, fanless

Weight

1.39 kg ( = 49.03 oz / 3.06 pounds), Power Supply: 288 g ( = 10.16 oz / 0.63 pounds)

Links

Lenovo homepageLenovo notebook section

Note: The manufacturer may use components from different suppliers including display panels, drives or memory sticks with similar specifications.

[+] Add to comparison

The chassis is made from two-tone plastic. The display lid and the bottom part of the base unit are white; all other parts are black. Three sides of the base unit are surrounded by a rubber bumper, which protects the upper base unit when the convertible is resting on it. The display can be rotated backwards a full 360 degrees to allow for different modes. The build quality is quite decent. As far as the sturdiness is concerned, the Yoga 300 exhibits the usual weaknesses: the chassis flexes in the areas next to the keyboard and below the touchpad. The base unit resists twisting quite well. To access the hardware, the bottom half of the base unit needs to be taken off, which is an easily accomplished job.

The small notebook features a decent number of ports. One of the three USB ports supports USB 3.0. HDMI out allows the user to connect a monitor or a TV. The physical ports are all located towards the rear on the left and right side.

The integrated card reader is about average as far as the speeds are concerned. Large data blocks are copied at a maximum transfer rate of 75.9 MB/s. The copy process of 250 jpeg-files (5 MB each) took place at 33.3 MB/s. For these tests we use our reference SD card Toshiba Exceria Pro SDXC 64 GB UHS-II.

Left side: lock slot, power jack, USB 2.0, card reader, automatic rotation, volume rocker switch

Right side: power button, One-Key recovery (recessed), USB 2.0, USB 3.0, HDMI, Gigabit Ethernet

Top 10 LaptopsMultimedia, Budget Multimedia, Gaming, Budget Gaming, Lightweight Gaming, Business, Budget Office, Workstation, Subnotebooks, Ultrabooks, Chromebooks

under 300 USD/Euros, under 500 USD/Euros, 1.000 USD/Euros

Best Displays, for University Students

Top 10 SmartphonesSmartphones, Phablets, ≤5-inch, Camera SmartphonesNotebookcheck's Top 10 Smartphones under 160 Euros

The chiclet keyboard does not feature a backlight. The flat keys are ever so slightly rough to the touch with well-defined feedback and short travel. The keyboard only flexes minimally, so typing is not affected at all. Overall, the quality of the keyboard is acceptable. The multi-touch-capable ClickPad measures about 9 x 6 cm (~3.5 x 2.4 in) and offers plenty of space for gestures. The smooth surface allows fingers to glide easily. The travel distance is short and the feedback well defined. In addition, the convertible also features a touchscreen as an alternative input method. The screen responds instantly and can recognize up to 10 touch points.

Input Devices

Subpixel-array

The Yoga 300 is equipped with an 11.6-inch touchscreen with a native resolution of 1366x768 pixels. Neither the brightness (241.6 cd/m²) nor the contrast (376:1) are standouts - an 11.6-inch convertible should offer more, especially since it's likely going to be used in different locations and different ambient light settings. A positive aspect: at no time did we encounter any PWM flickering.

228cd/m²245cd/m²243cd/m²
231cd/m²256cd/m²246cd/m²
235cd/m²249cd/m²241cd/m²
Distribution of brightness

AU Optronics B116XTN02.3

X-Rite i1Pro 2

Maximum: 256 cd/m² Average: 241.6 cd/m²Brightness Distribution: 89 %

Center on Battery: 210 cd/m²

Contrast: 376:1 (Black: 0.68 cd/m²)ΔE Color 8.87 | 0.6-29.43 Ø6ΔE Greyscale 9.6 | 0.64-98 Ø6.255% sRGB (Argyll 3D) 35% AdobeRGB 1998 (Argyll 3D)

Gamma: 2.2

ICC File (X-Rite i1Pro 2)
Screen flickering / PWM not detected

In comparison: 51 % of all tested devices do not use PWM to dim the display. If PWM was detected, an average of 9378 (minimum: 43 - maximum: 142900) Hz was measured.

As shipped, the color DeltaE deviation is 8.87. The goal is a value of less than 3. In addition, the display panel suffers from a bluish hue.

CalMAN - Color Checker

CalMAN - Graylevels

CalMAN - Saturation

   ↔    Response Time Black to White   ↔    Response Time 50% Grey to 80% Grey
24 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 7 ms rise
↘ 17 ms fall
The screen shows good response rates in our tests, but may be too slow for competitive gamers.In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.8 (minimum) to 240 (maximum) ms. » 34 % of all devices are better.

This means that the measured response time is similar to the average of all tested devices (25 ms).

58 ms ... rise ↗ and fall ↘ combined↗ 26 ms rise
↘ 32 ms fall
The screen shows slow response rates in our tests and will be unsatisfactory for gamers.In comparison, all tested devices range from 0.9 (minimum) to 636 (maximum) ms. » 93 % of all devices are better.

This means that the measured response time is worse than the average of all tested devices (39.7 ms).

For some inexplicable reason, Lenovo decided to outfit the Yoga 300 with a panel based on TN technology. The viewing angles are therefore restricted, even though this particular display is one of the better ones and the viewing angles are greater than normal. IPS panels are still much better in that regard. The convertible is not easy to use outdoors because of glossy and reflective display in combination with the low maximum brightness.

The Yoga 300 outdoors (sun from behind)

The Yoga 300-11IBR is an 11.6-inch convertible notebook. The hardware is good enough for simple word processing and web browsing. Our review notebook sells for 380 Euro (~$430). Other versions are available as well with the price starting of 300 Euro (~$340). 

The Yoga 300 is equipped with an Intel Celeron N3050 (Braswell) dual-core processor with a clock speed of 1.6 GHz. The Turbo can overclock the cores up to 2.16 GHz. The CPU is quite frugal with a TDP of 6 watts, which in turn allows for passive cooling. The Celeron is not exactly powerful and cannot handle much more than simple word processing. During our benchmark runs, the CPU maintained the Turbo-maximum both with the notebook plugged in and running on battery power.

Cinebench R10 Rendering Single 32Bit

1068

Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 32Bit

1999

Cinebench R10 Shading 32Bit

2227

Cinebench R15 CPU Single 64Bit

29 Points

Cinebench R15 CPU Multi 64Bit

60 Points

Cinebench R15 OpenGL 64Bit

13.82 fps

Help

Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus Transformer Book Flip TP200SA-FV0108TSHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus X200MA-BING-KX366BHD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2830, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Toshiba Satellite Radius 11 L10W-C-108HD Graphics (Braswell), N3700, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Acer Aspire R11 R3-131T-C122HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, HBG3e 32G eMMC
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus Transformer Book Flip TP200SA-FV0108TSHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus X200MA-BING-KX366BHD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2830, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Toshiba Satellite Radius 11 L10W-C-108HD Graphics (Braswell), N3700, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Acer Aspire R11 R3-131T-C122HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, HBG3e 32G eMMC
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus Transformer Book Flip TP200SA-FV0108TSHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo Ideapad 100S 80R2HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus X200MA-BING-KX366BHD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2830, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Asus EeeBook X205TA-FD005BSHD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Toshiba Satellite Radius 11 L10W-C-108HD Graphics (Braswell), N3700, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Acer Aspire R11 R3-131T-C122HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, HBG3e 32G eMMC
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus Transformer Book Flip TP200SA-FV0108TSHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo Ideapad 100S 80R2HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus X200MA-BING-KX366BHD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2830, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Asus EeeBook X205TA-FD005BSHD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Toshiba Satellite Radius 11 L10W-C-108HD Graphics (Braswell), N3700, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Acer Aspire R11 R3-131T-C122HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, HBG3e 32G eMMC
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus Transformer Book Flip TP200SA-FV0108TSHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Toshiba Satellite Radius 11 L10W-C-108HD Graphics (Braswell), N3700, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Acer Aspire R11 R3-131T-C122HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, HBG3e 32G eMMC
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus Transformer Book Flip TP200SA-FV0108TSHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Toshiba Satellite Radius 11 L10W-C-108HD Graphics (Braswell), N3700, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Acer Aspire R11 R3-131T-C122HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, HBG3e 32G eMMC
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Dell Chromebook 11-3120HD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2840, 16 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus X200MA-BING-KX366BHD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2830, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Lenovo N20 ChromebookHD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2830, 16 GB eMMC Flash
Acer CB3-111HD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2840
Asus EeeBook X205TA-FD005BSHD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Toshiba Satellite Radius 11 L10W-C-108HD Graphics (Braswell), N3700, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Acer Aspire R11 R3-131T-C122HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, HBG3e 32G eMMC
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Dell Chromebook 11-3120HD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2840, 16 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo N20 ChromebookHD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2830, 16 GB eMMC Flash
Acer CB3-111HD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2840
Asus EeeBook X205TA-FD005BSHD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Dell Chromebook 11-3120HD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2840, 16 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo N20 ChromebookHD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2830, 16 GB eMMC Flash
Acer CB3-111HD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2840
Asus EeeBook X205TA-FD005BSHD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Dell Chromebook 11-3120HD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2840, 16 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo N20 ChromebookHD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2830, 16 GB eMMC Flash
Acer CB3-111HD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2840
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142

* ... smaller is better

The system runs trouble-free and without any stutters. Potential buyers should be aware that the convertible was only designed to handle word processing and similar tasks. Common news and online-shop websites can take a little while to load. The results of the PC Mark benchmark tests reflect the performance of the integrated SoC. The convertible scores better than competitors with Bay Trail hardware thanks to the more powerful Braswell GPU. Swapping out the hybrid HDD for an SSD should improve the overall system performance.

PCMark 8 Home Score Accelerated v21633 points
PCMark 8 Creative Score Accelerated v21650 points
PCMark 8 Work Score Accelerated v21295 points

Help

Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo Ideapad 100S 80R2HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus EeeBook X205TA-FD005BSHD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142

The Aspire is equipped with a hybrid HDD from Seagate. The drive rotates at 5400 RPM and has a capacity of 500 GB. The included SSD cache (8 GB) increases the load speed of frequently used applications. The transfer rates are equivalent to normal platter-based 5400-RPM drives.

Transfer Rate Minimum: 51.9 MB/sTransfer Rate Maximum: 113.2 MB/sTransfer Rate Average: 89.8 MB/s Sequential Read: 118.9 MB/sSequential Write: 117.2 MB/s4K QD32 Write: 0.724 MB/s

Intel's HD Graphics (Braswell) supports DirectX 12 and operates at speeds of up to 600 MHz. The results of the 3D Mark benchmarks are as expected for this particular GPU. The new graphics card is clearly better than the predecessor Bay Trail thanks to the new architecture.

An integrated decoder takes load off the processor during the playback of common video formats. The convertible can even handle H.265 (successor to H.264) 4K videos. When we ran our video (4k, H.265, 60 fps), the CPU load remained under 10%. For our tests we used the movie and TV app Windows 10 comes with, as it supports hardware acceleration of H.265 videos.

3DMark 11 Performance434 points
3DMark Ice Storm Standard Score14342 points
3DMark Cloud Gate Standard Score1327 points
3DMark Fire Strike Score256 points

Help

Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo Ideapad 100S 80R2HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus X200MA-BING-KX366BHD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2830, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Asus EeeBook X205TA-FD005BSHD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Toshiba Satellite Radius 11 L10W-C-108HD Graphics (Braswell), N3700, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Acer Aspire R11 R3-131T-C122HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, HBG3e 32G eMMC
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus Transformer Book Flip TP200SA-FV0108TSHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Toshiba Satellite Radius 11 L10W-C-108HD Graphics (Braswell), N3700, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus Transformer Book Flip TP200SA-FV0108TSHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo Ideapad 100S 80R2HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus EeeBook X205TA-FD005BSHD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Toshiba Satellite Radius 11 L10W-C-108HD Graphics (Braswell), N3700, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Acer Aspire R11 R3-131T-C122HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, HBG3e 32G eMMC
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate ST500LM000 Solid State Hybrid Drive
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus Transformer Book Flip TP200SA-FV0108TSHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo Ideapad 100S 80R2HD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Acer Aspire ES1-131HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Asus X200MA-BING-KX366BHD Graphics (Bay Trail), N2830, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Asus EeeBook X205TA-FD005BSHD Graphics (Bay Trail), Z3735F, 32 GB eMMC Flash
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRHD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, Seagate Momentus Thin ST500LT012-1DG142
Toshiba Satellite Radius 11 L10W-C-108HD Graphics (Braswell), N3700, Hitachi Travelstar Z5K500 HTS545050A7E680
Acer Aspire R11 R3-131T-C122HD Graphics (Braswell), N3050, HBG3e 32G eMMC

Users interested in gaming should stick with the casual games available from the Windows Store. Modern 3D games like Rise of the Tomb Raider are out of the question, since the hardware is simply not powerful enough.

low med. high ultra
BioShock Infinite (2013) 22.111.49.6fps

The SoC is passively cooled, so there is no fan system. The hard drive is audible, although we needed to pay close attention to hear it at all, as this particular model is very quiet. Swapping the HDD for an SSD would result in an utterly silent notebook.

Noise Level

Idle

32.4 / 32.5 / 32.5 dB(A)

HDD 32.2 dB(A)
Load 32.5 / 32.4 dB(A)
 
 

30 dBsilent

40 dB(A)audible

50 dB(A)loud

 
min: , med: , max:    Audix TM1 Arta (15 cm distance)

The Yoga 300 during the stress test

The Yoga handles the stress test (Prime95 and FurMark are running for at least one hour) in identical fashion no matter if it is plugged in or not. The CPU (2.16 GHz) and the GPU (600 MHz) deliver the full performance for about one minute before throttling occurs (down to 1.6 GHz and 520 MHz, respectively). After the initial slowdown, further decreases happen very slowly: after one hour we recorded 1.3 to 1.4 GHz for the CPU and 500 MHz for the GPU. The convertible does not get very warm. All areas remained under 40 degrees Celsius (104 Fahrenheit).

 32.8 °C91 F37 °C99 F37.9 °C100 F 
 32.7 °C91 F36.7 °C98 F38 °C100 F 
 28.8 °C84 F30 °C86 F33.2 °C92 F 
Maximum: 38 °C = 100 FAverage: 34.1 °C = 93 F
38.3 °C101 F37.6 °C100 F34 °C93 F
35 °C95 F35.7 °C96 F30.3 °C87 F
34.2 °C94 F31.6 °C89 F29.3 °C85 F
Maximum: 38.3 °C = 101 FAverage: 34 °C = 93 F

Power Supply (max.)  34.9 °C = 95 F | Room Temperature 22.8 °C = 73 F | FIRT 550-Pocket

 25 °C77 F25.8 °C78 F25.4 °C78 F 
 23.7 °C75 F25.3 °C78 F25.1 °C77 F 
 22.5 °C73 F22.5 °C73 F24.6 °C76 F 
Maximum: 25.8 °C = 78 FAverage: 24.4 °C = 76 F
24.5 °C76 F27.1 °C81 F25.9 °C79 F
24.8 °C77 F25.5 °C78 F24.1 °C75 F
26 °C79 F24.9 °C77 F23.8 °C75 F
Maximum: 27.1 °C = 81 FAverage: 25.2 °C = 77 F

Power Supply (max.)  26.6 °C = 80 F | Room Temperature 20 °C = 68 F | FIRT 550-Pocket

(±) The average temperature for the upper side under maximal load is 34.1 °C / 93 F, compared to the average of 30.3 °C / 87 F for the devices in the class Convertible.(+) The maximum temperature on the upper side is 38 °C / 100 F, compared to the average of 35.3 °C / 96 F, ranging from 21.8 to 55.7 °C for the class Convertible.(+) The bottom heats up to a maximum of 38.3 °C / 101 F, compared to the average of 36.5 °C / 98 F(+) In idle usage, the average temperature for the upper side is 24.4 °C / 76 F, compared to the device average of 30.3 °C / 87 F.(+) The palmrests and touchpad are reaching skin temperature as a maximum (33.2 °C / 91.8 F) and are therefore not hot. (-) The average temperature of the palmrest area of similar devices was 28.9 °C / 84 F (-4.3 °C / -7.8 F).

Pink noise

The stereo speakers are located towards the front edge on the bottom of the convertible. The output quality is acceptable but not great, as the sound can get a little tinny.

During idle, the convertible consumes a maximum of 7.8 watts - 3 watts less than the netbook sibling. During the stress test, the power consumption increased to 16 watts, which is the same draw we measured under medium load. The reason is the throttling of both the CPU and the GPU performance during the stress test. The power adapter is rated at 45 watts.

Power Consumption
Off / Standby 0.45 / 0.5 Watt
Idle 5.6 / 7.7 / 7.8 Watt
Load 16 / 16 Watt
 
Key: min: , med: , max:         Metrahit Energy

Our practical WLAN test revealed a run time of 5 hours and 8 minutes. This result matches that of the IdeaPad 300s-11IBR, which shut down after 5 hours and 15 minutes. For this test, we use the balanced profile and set the display to a brightness of 150 cd/m². 

Battery Runtime
NBC WiFi Websurfing Battery Test 1.3 (Edge 25.10586.0.0)5h 08min
Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBRN3050, 30 Wh
Acer Aspire One Cloudbook 11 AO1-131-C58KN3050, 32 Wh
Lenovo Ideapad 100S 80R2Z3735F, 32 Wh
Dell Chromebook 11-3120N2840, 43 Wh
Acer Aspire ES1-131N3050, 38 Wh
Asus X200MA-BING-KX366BN2830, 33 Wh
Lenovo IdeaPad 300S-11IBRN3050, 30 Wh
Toshiba Satellite Radius 11 L10W-C-108N3700,  Wh
Acer Aspire R11 R3-131T-C122N3050, 50 Wh
Lenovo N20 ChromebookN2830, 35 Wh
Acer CB3-111N2840, 36 Wh
Asus EeeBook X205TA-FD005BSZ3735F, 38 Wh

+ quiet

+ doesn't get hot

- battery life is just average

- weak CPU

- low viewing angle stability

- warranty only 12 months

In review: Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBR. Test model courtesy of notebooksbilliger.de

The Yoga 300-11IB is an 11.6-inch convertible designed for simple word processing and web browsing. When connected to a TV, the notebook can also function as a silent video playback station. The Yoga 300 is very quiet and does not get hot. The 500 GB hybrid HDD offers plenty of storage capacity. If desired, the HDD can be swapped out for a higher-capacity model or an SSD. The battery life is fairly average; some competitors offer substantially longer run times. The warranty coverage is also nothing to get excited about, as Lenovo covers the convertible for only one year.

For some inexplicable reason, Lenovo decided to outfit the Yoga 300 with a TN panel. The viewing angle stability is therefore not great. 

In our opinion, there is no place for a screen based on this technology within the group of tablets and convertibles. Even though this particular screen is better than normal, the viewing angles of an IPS display are much better still.

Lenovo Yoga 300-11IBR - 2016-04-1804/18/2016 v5.1(old)Sascha Mölck

Connectivity

50 / 80 → 62%

Games Performance

40 / 68 → 59%

Application Performance

39 / 87 → 45%

Convertible - Weighted Average

www.notebookcheck.net

Lenovo Yoga 300: An inexpensive hybrid laptop-tablet which skimps on screen quality

Asus may have established itself as the master of budget hybrids whose screens pop off, but Lenovo has staked a similar claim on hybrids whose screens flip around. There’s a whole dynasty of Yoga laptops of this design, and the Lenovo Yoga 300 11.6in is the most affordable of the lot. See also: Best budget laptops to buy right now.

Also see: Best Black Friday Laptop Deals

It’s not flashy and expectations of screen quality need to be realistic to avoid disappointment. However, few hybrids or tablets can cope with deal with the limited space of train and airplane tables as well as the Yoga 300.

Lenovo Yoga 300 review: Price

The Lenovo Yoga 300 is the cheapest laptop in Lenovo's range of devices with screens that flip all the way over, so lid meets keyboard. It costs £279.99 from Amazon, a good student-friendly price.

This is the version we're reviewing. However, there's an even cheaper one too. If your upper limit is closer to £200, there's a Yoga 300 that has a Celeron processor and 32GB solid state storage instead of a 500GB hard drive. It is likely to feel a bit slower, but the lower price lets it slip into a whole new bargain hunter category. You can buy it from Amazon for £179.99.

However, you won't find this slightly older version on Lenovo's own online store, where the updated 80M100FCUK (the Celeron model) costs £299.99 and has a 500GB hard drive. The white version you see in our photos is available from Lenovo directly, while we could only find the black version on Amazon.

Lenovo Yoga 300 review: Features and design

The Lenovo Yoga 300 is the most laptop-like of the two very broadest of hybrid categories. Its screen doesn't detach, but the hinge lets it flip around almost 360 degrees, turning a laptop into a chunky tablet.

Don't think of this as just a laptop plus a bizarrely chunky iPad, though. Part of the appeal is that the screen can sit at all sorts of angles in-between. It'll sit at the right angle for you to watch TV in bed, or in its 'tent' arrangement will even fit on one of those tiny train seat tables.

 

A fixed hybrid may be more useful than you might imagine. The hinge is solid, as is the rest of the build. Rubberised sides around by the connections should also make it a bit less prone to damage from bumps, and there’s no serious flex to the keyboard.

The Lenovo Yoga 300 has none of the flashiness of the Yoga 900 from the outside, though. It's plastic, and not super-skinny at 22mm thick. It is still ultra-portable, though, weighing 1.39kg and occupying a footprint still radically smaller than a full-size laptop. There are smaller and lighter 11-inch models out there, but this is still something you could take around with you 24/7.

Inside, the Yoga 300 looks surprisingly similar to the much more expensive Yoga laptops. There's a certain character to the design of the keyboard and trackpads that's pleasantly consistent, and the keyboard surround is metal rather than plastic. Among sub-£300 laptops, it’s a plush interior.

Lenovo Yoga 300 review: Keyboard and trackpad

It is a pity the quality of the keyboard itself hasn't made the transition too. The Lenovo Yoga 300's key feedback is very soft, leading to an unsatisfying typing feel. This is a problem when having a full keyboard is one of the only reasons to buy this over a normal tablet.

 

Granted, it is still much better than a virtual keyboard, but the Dell 11 3000 laptop has a much better one.

Typing ends up feeling vague, although once you’ve bedded into this feel the well-sized keys should make accurate typing easy enough.

The Lenovo Yoga 300’s trackpad makes a good mimicry of the more expensive Yogas too, using a plastic surface that feels fairly similar to the frosted glass used in the priciest machines. Lenovo hybrids and ultrabooks routinely have fairly serious driver problems with their trackpads, but we’ve experienced no major problems here.

While smaller than the pad you might see on a 13-inch style laptop, it feels and looks good.

The Yoga 300 doesn’t have all of its drivers nailed down, though. We’ve had major problems with the hybrid’s Wi-Fi. Your experiences may vary, but our Yoga 300 repeatedly refuses to connect to our test router, only succeeding a small fraction of the time. It is frustrating.

Lenovo Yoga 300 review: Connectivity

Attention Lenovo doesn’t put into some of the final software touches are repaid in part with surprisingly comprehensive connectivity. The Lenovo Yoga 300 has three USB ports (one USB 3.0), a full-size Ethernet port, HDMI socket and a full-size SD card slot.

 

A lot of tiddly laptops use smaller connectors and fewer USBs, while this one has what you might get in a 15.6-inch laptop. This one is ready to become the brains of a desktop PC, although we’d recommend looking for something with a Core i processor if you want anything that feels remotely like desktop-grade power.

Lenovo Yoga 300 review: Screen

While at this price you’ll find tablets with quite excellent screens, the Lenovo Yoga 300’s display quality is much more like that of a cheap laptop. Not good, in other words.

Some retailers describe the laptop as having an IPS LCD screen, but it’s actually just a basic TN LCD panel. This type is hardly ever used in tablets anymore because of its poor viewing angles.

Look at the Lenovo Yoga 300 from some angles and the screen appears all shadowy, with distorted colour. This restricts the appeal of the 360-degree hinge a little, but it tends to look reasonable when you’re the only viewer. Just don’t expect this to act like a satisfying mini movie screen.

It’s really too small for such a task anyway. As a super-portable device it has a fairly dinky 11.6-inch display, of 1366 x 768 pixel resolution. As with the panel type, this is poor compared with almost any standalone laptop, but sits perfectly happily among budget laptops.

Up close pixellation will become very clear, but it’s not too obvious if you use the Lenovo Yoga 300 on a desk or table, as you would a laptop.

Colour performance is predictably fairly bad, covering just 57.3 percent of the sRGB colour gamut, 39.5 percent of Adobe RGB and 40.6 of DCI P3. This is acceptable given the low price, but means the Yoga 300 doesn’t look hugely punchy or vivid.

The most obvious screen limitation here is one that isn’t explained with figures and display benchmarks, though. Thanks to its rather dated screen architecture, the actual base tone of the screen appears grey rather than black.

This is nothing to do with traditional LCD screen contrast, which is more about how dark the display backlight can appear while the rest off the screen is lit, but that tiny air gaps in the display construction reflect ambient light. Even when the Yoga 300 is turned off, the display will look grey-ish as long as you’re in a reasonably well-lit room.

The Yoga 300’s native display contrast is very bad at 200:1 anyway, but this dated screen architecture makes the perception of contrast even worse. This is what happens when a touchscreen like the Yoga 300’s is implemented without having enough budget to use air gap-busting screen lamination.

The screen is fairly poor. We also wouldn’t recommend this device for outdoors use. The glossy, low-contrast isn’t a good place to start from anyway, and max brightness of 208cd/m is low too. It’s going to be a chore to use outdoors on a sunny or overcast day.

www.techadvisor.co.uk

Lenovo Yoga 300 (11IBY) hard drive upgrade

I recently took delivery of a Lenovo Yoga 300, the lower-end model of their impressive convertible line.

This otherwise perfectly usable Laptop with 4GB RAM and a Celeron N2840 chip unfortunately ships with a traditional WD Blue hard drive (at the time of writing) and it’s noticeable. With a slower processor, the least I could do to alleviate some of that performance bottleneck is swap the HDD out with a nice, speedy SSD.

The reason I’m documenting this is due to the lack of information online. I ended up following the official service manual supplied by Lenovo which still leaves a little to be desired, though allowed me to get the job done.

The below is documented under the assumption that:

  • You have an OS already installed on the SSD or
  • You’re going to reinstall with a USB stick after booting up with the new drive

Lenovo have used a combination of M2 screws and plastic clips to secure the bottom panel to the laptop chassis. While the screws come out with ease, the plastic clips take a little more persuasion.

  1. Remove all screws. These are 6.5 M2’s and a suitable screwdriver should be used. NB: The 4 screws at the front are angled slightly. Not an issue now, but bare this in mind later.
  2. Start by lifting the corners at the hinges first. These should pop up with ease, so don’t lift too forcefully.

  3. Gently pry the bottom panel away from the chassis between the hinges. This will require a little more effort and will ‘pop’ 3-4 times.

  4. As the bottom panel is quite tight to the sides of the chassis, gently pull upwards between the hinges, this will effectively lever the panel clips ever so slightly away from the sides of the frame, requiring very little effort to then pull the sides up either with fingernails or a spudger.

  5. Once both sides are up, the front of the panel will still be securely fastened using slightly different clips. I found the best way of releasing them was to take a firm hold of one of the corners, pull away from the front of the chassis and down while levering against a spudger or finger placed close to the front corner (on the same side, naturally). This should effectively pull the panel away from the chassis and up, resulting in a satisfying pop as it releases. Repeat this pulling motion while gently manipulating the front of the panel. It will become increasingly easier to pop the remaining clips as each releases.

With the front of the laptop facing you, the hard drive is easily accessible on the left.

  1. Remove the SATA connector
  2. Remove the 3 4mm M2 screws using a suitable (different) screwdriver. My model used three to secure the hard drive on the bottom left, right and top right as pictured.

  3. Once free, remove the hard drive from the chassis and put the laptop to one side.

  4. The hard drive has a metal adapter screwed on to each side, transfer these to the new SSD making sure to match orientation of the plates when doing so.

Reassemble

At this stage the old hard drive should be out and the new SSD in, all that remains is to reassemble the device in reverse order.

  1. Screw the SSD into place and reattach the SATA cable
  2. When refitting the bottom panel, do so in the reverse of the way it was removed; fit the front first and lever the panel down. It will likely require some gentle persuasion to slot back into the sides.

  3. Gently click the plastic tabs back into place from front to back. The front will require a little more force but not much. Remember the back corners will not clip (so don’t force them), but between the hinges will.

  4. Screw the bottom panel down loosely, double checking all plastic clips have clipped before fully tightening the screws. Remember the front screws are at a slight angle, be aware of this and don’t cross-thread the screws!

Power on

Or actually, before you do, flip the laptop the right side up and give it a gentle shake. If there’s nothing rattling about you’ve done a good job. While you’re at it, test the volume rocker on the side to ensure it’s still “clicky” and hasn’t been fouled by the case.

When ready, power on.

Enjoy the added benefits of an SSD and if you need any assistance leave a comment below or @jasonbayton on twitter.

bayton.org

Lenovo Yoga 300 11 (Flex 3 11) review - an affordable 11-inch hybrid

There are quite a few 11-inch mini laptops with affordable price tags out there, and the Lenovo Yoga 300 11 (also known as the Flex 3 11 in some parts of the world) is Lenovo’s offer in this competitive niche.

It’s a hybrid that sells for between $300 and $400 and includes a 360-degrees convertible screen, fairly nice aesthetics, a good keyboard and Intel BayTrail-M hardware, among its strong selling points. Those are paired with a small battery though, a subpar screen and a glitchy trackpad, even by the segment’s low standards.

That’s the short story. The detailed review awaits for you below, where I’ve gathered my impressions after using a Yoga 3 11 for a little over one week. The test unit came from Lenovo for the purpose of this test. It went back to them once the article was published.

The specs sheet

Lenovo Yoga 300 (Flex 3) 11 1120
Screen11.6 inch, 1366 x 768 px resolution, TN, touch
ProcessorIntel BayTrail Pentium N3540
GraphicsIntegrated Intel Gen 7 Graphics
Memory8 GB DDR3
Storage1 TB 2.5″ 5400 rpm 9.5mm HDD (Hitachi Travelstar 5K1000)
ConnectivityWireless AC (Intel 3160 Dual Band), Bluetooth 4.0, Gigabit LAN
Ports1 x USB 3.0, 2 x USB 2.0, HDMI, SD card-reader, headphone jack, RJ45
Battery30 Wh
Operating systemWindows 8.1
Size299 x 209 x 22 mm (11.8” x 8.2” x 0.86”)
Weight1.36 kg (3 lbs)
Extrasnon-backlit keyboard, available in White or Black

We have the higher-specked version of the Yoga 300 for this test. The base version has a retail price of $299 and includes a slower Celeron N2940 processor and only 4 GB of RAM.

Design and exterior

I got to test the white version of the Yoga 300 11 and I think it looks really nice for a device in this price range. Plastic is used for the entire case and the chassis, but it’s a smooth plastic that feels nice to the touch, offers grip and won’t show scratches and smudges easily. The build quality is pretty good as well, as there’s little flex in the screen or the main-body, but the case does squeak when pressed or grabbed firmly.

A set of hinges holds the screen in place and allow it to convert into the Tablet, Stand or Tent modes. These hinges are strong and made of metal, but they squeak when flipping the screen. I can’t tell whether that’s going to be an issue with the devices you’ll be able to buy in stores or just an isolated incident with this review sample.

Now, once you open the lid you’ll notice a dark interior. The palm-rest and the entire area around the keyboard are covered in a sheet on brushed aluminum, while the edges around the interior and the screen are made from a rougher type of plastic. These edges are meant to protect the inner surface and the screen, as they are slightly raised, in order to prevent the display of touching the keyboard when the screen is closed, or protect the metallic finish and the keys of coming in contact with any surfaces when you’ll have the Yoga on a desk in Tablet or Stand modes. In this case, the device will lean on this plastic rim around the body, and not on the palm-rest or the keys. That’s a neat approach, but keep in mind this rim is a bit sharp and your wrists won’t be happy about that.

Overall though, this Yoga 300 11 is one of the better built and better looking devices in its class. Lenovo doesn’t offer any colored versions of it, unlike some of the competition, and that could be a deal-breaker for some of you.

On the practical side, I have to add that the hinge mechanism is strong and well executed, so I could easily lift the screen with a single hand. Switching between modes is buttery smooth as well. Once the device detects it’s no longer in laptop mode (the screen tilts past 180-200 degrees), it will automatically disable the keyboard and trackpad, so you don’t activate them by mistake.

On the other hand, this hybrid struggles as a tablet, since it’s rather heavy, chunky and difficult to grab and hold, mostly due to how the screen and the main-body are designed and fit together in this mode (as you can see from the pictures).

The last thing we’ll discuss in this chapter is the IO. I have little to complain here, as this notebook offers three USB ports, a full-size HDMI connector, a LAN port and an SD card-reader. An SD card doesn’t fit flush inside though. The charging port is smartly placed on the left edge, where you’ll also find a Kensington Lock.

Keyboard and trackpad

I was impressed by the keyboard on the Yoga 300 11 is and that doesn’t happen often. It sits high on the body, leaving plenty of room for a spacious arm-rest, and offers a good typing experience. The keys are firm and well spaced, while the layout is simple, standard, without any unusual experiments.

The stroke is short and the keys don’t pose much resistance, but these aspects had little impact on my accuracy once i got used to the overall feel. The stroke is not shorter than on other thin-and-light laptops, but since this laptop is not exactly the thinnest of them all, Lenovo could have done a better job here. The keyboard on the larger Yoga 500 for instance has similar keys, but because they are taller and stiffer, offer improved feedback.

I found the trackpad on the other hand rather crappy. It’s well sized and spaced-out from the palm-rest, but its rough plastic surface feels weird, especially in this day and age when most manufacturers use smooth touchpads. Still, that’s not the main issue, performance is. Despite being a Synaptics surface and having plenty of adjustability settings, I couldn’t get this to perform well with precision swipes or when clicking with one finger and swiping with another, and I couldn’t get Two-Fingers taps to work either (this is a know problem with Lenovo laptops and can be addressed through registry editing, but that’s not something most users will know how, or want to do).

Bottom point, the keyboard on the Yoga 300 11 is good, although shallower than on other Lenovo laptops, but the trackpad needs improvement, at least based on my experience with this test unit.

Screen

Then there’s the display. Lenovo uses a touchscreen on this 11-incher and everything works as expected on this front. It doesn’t include a digitizer or proper pen support, but I haven’t encountered any glitches when swiping and and tapping with my fingers. The hinges keep the display firmly in place and have a significant impact on the overall experience.

However, Lenovo went for an 11-inch 1366 x 768 px TN panel for this device, which translates in rather poor viewing angles, color reproduction, brightness and contrast, as you can see in the results below (taken with the Spyder4 Elite).

  • Panel HardwareID: BOE NT116WHM-N11;
  • Coverage: 64% sRGB, 46% NTSC, 48% AdobeRGB;
  • measured gamma: 2.0;
  • max brightness in the middle of the screen: 187 cd/m2 on power;
  • contrast at max brightness: 90:1 (?);
  • white point: 7200 K;
  • black on max brightness: 2.12 cd/m2;
  • average DeltaE: 9.55 uncalibrated, 2.38 calibrated .

How do these translate in everyday use? Well, the screen is dim, and because of its glossy finish, it barely usable in any bright-light environments or outdoor use. The viewing angles are somewhat limited, but they are better than on most TN panels, so as long as you look at the screen straight on or from a medium lateral angle, they won’t bother you much. The colors on the other hand are skewed rather badly, especially the Reds and the Blues. A calibration run helps somewhat, but don’t expect to perform any color accurate work on this thing.

It’s true that similar 11-inchers offer the same kind of displays, especially around the $300 price-point. If you’re willing to spend around $100 more for your computer, you can get 11-incher with way better IPS panels, like the Dell Inspiron 11 3000. We’ll talk about it further down, in the Competitors section.

Hardware, performance and upgrade options

Hardware wise, this version of the Lenovo Yoga 300 11 is built on an Intel BayTrail-M platform, with a Pentium N3540 processor, 8 GB of RAM and a 1 TB HDD. The storage unit is upgradeable, but the RAM is not, so if you’ll buy one of the versions with only 2 or 4 GB of RAM you’ll be stuck with it for good.

With such hardware, the Yoga 300 11 is not going to be a performer, but it was never designed as one. It was meant to handle light everyday tasks, while running quiet (this is a fanless platform) and cool. And it will get the job done as long as you stick to browsing with a few tabs open, watching movies or stream clips from Youtube and Netflix in 1080p, editing Office documents, listening to music and so on.

This little fellow can handle some multitasking as well, but don’t try to run too many things at once or it will choke. In other words, if you’ll keep to basic tasks and be patient when the occasional sluggishness will occur, you’ll get along fine with this computer.

Out of the box though there’s a lot of bloatware preinstalled, with a dozen of Lenovo apps and half a dozen of third party software as well, from McAfee, CyberLink, Amazon, Dropbox or Microsoft. I’d advise most of you to get rid of these in order to speed up the machine. However, if you’re using Dropbox, you might want to redeem those 15 GB of Free Storage space available for 6 months.

I ran some benchmarks on this Yoga 300 11 and you can find the results below, if you’re interested in such aspects.

  • 3DMark 13: Ice Storm – 21723, Cloud Gate –1731, Sky Driver – 625, Fire Strike – 178;
  • PCMark 08: Home Conventional – 1544;
  • CineBench 11.5: OpenGL 8.49 fps, CPU 1.88 pts, CPU Single Core 0.50 pts;
  • CineBench R15: OpenGL 6.84 fps, CPU 154 cb, CPU Single Core 43 cb;
  • X264 Benchmark 4.0: Pass 1 – 55.71 fps, Pass 2 – 11.21 fps.

Long story short, this Yoga 300 11 is not a performer, but will handle everyday tasks fine, as long as you keep your demands at bay. Just don’t expect to run demanding software, modern PC games or multitask between many apps at once, this machine won’t be able to face such chores.

Noise, Heat, Connectivity, speakers and others

This laptop gets a bit warmer than I would have liked in everyday use, but nor the hardware inside or the outer-case reach extremely high temperatures. Still, as you can see in the pictures below, while looping a 1080p movie, certain spots on the back go past the 35 degrees Celsius mark. That’s a bit unexpected, as other 11-inchers run cooler and this Yoga is not a very slim machine after all.

If you’ll push this little fellow even more, the belly will go above 40 degrees and at that point you won’t be able to use the Yoga comfortably on your lap.

*Daily Use – 1080p Youtube clip in IE for 30 minutes

I haven’t tried to run any games, but expect the case to get close to 45 degrees if you push the hardware to its limits. You’ll also feel the heat at keyboard-level, especially with the metallic coating on the palm-rest and around the keys.

Moving on to noise, the Yoga 300 11 is built on fanless hardware, but it does bundle a mechanical HDD and you’ll hear it cranking and spinning in a quiet room. So if you want this to be dead-silent, you’ll have to replace the HDD with an SSD.

Connectivity wise, there’s little to complain here, since the laptop offers Bluetooth, Gigabit Lan and Wi-Fi. Lenovo went for an Intel AC 3160 wireless module, a rather slow one only capable of reaching speeds of around 50-55 Mbps in close proximity of my router. The signal remains strong at 30 feet and the speeds barely drop by a few Mbps, so overall most users will be happy with the wi-fi performance. You can switch to the wired connection when in need of faster speeds.

The speakers are placed on the bottom, towards the laptop’s front, and bounce sound off the table and towards the user. As long as you make sure not to cover them in any way, they are fairly loud (about 80 dB at head-level) and push decent quality sound, for this class. Don’t expect bass or high-quality audio of any kind, of course, but for movies and some music I’d say this audio system will do. The speakers will face you when with the Yoga in Tablet or Tent modes, and that has a positive impact on how the audio is perceived.

Last but not least, there’s a 720p webcam placed on top of the screen. It will do for occasional calls, but the image quality is very grainy, among the worst I’ve tested lately. Lenovo bundles the Yoga 300 with a gesture app that allows you to perform various gestures to turn up and down the volume, swipe between images etc. It works fine, but I can’t see why anyone would want to use this daily.

Battery life

This is where the Yoga 300 11 falls short, just like its predecessor, the Yoga 2 11 , and that’s because Lenovo only bundles the Yoga 11 with a 30 Wh battery. For the sake of comparison, most other manufacturers put a 30 Wh battery in their smaller 10-inchers.

As a result, you shouldn’t expect more than 3-5 hours of daily use from this device, as you can see from the rows below (the screen is manually set at 60% brightness, which is about 120 nits).

  • 4.2 W (~7 h of use) – idle, Power Saving Mode, screen at 0%, Wi-Fi OFF;
  • 5.5 W (~5 h 20 min of use) – very light browsing and text editing in Google Drive, Balanced Mode, screen at 40%, Wi-Fi ON;
  • 5.8 W (~5 h 10 min of use) – 1080p fullscreen video on Youtube in Internet Explorer, Balanced Mode, screen at 40%, Wi-Fi ON;
  • 6.5 W (~4 h 30 min of use) – 1080p fullscreen .mkv video in VLC Player, Balanced Mode, screen at 40%, Wi-Fi ON;
  • 8 W (~3 h 30 min of use) – heavy browsing in Internet Explorer, Balanced Mode, screen at 40%, Wi-Fi ON;

On the other hand, the laptop charges quickly, in under 2 hours. A 45 Wh power-brick with a long power-cable is included in the pack.

There’s only a 30 Wh battery inside this Yoga, so it will only go for 3 to 5 hours of daily use on a charge

Price and availability

The Yoga 300 11 is available around the world and the configuration tested here sells for around $400 in the US or 400 EUR in Europe. However, it’s sold as the Lenovo Flex 3 11 in some regions. Don’t confuse it with the Yoga 3 11, that’s a different machine with faster hardware and more premium specs.

The base models with a Celeron N2940 BayTrail processor, 4 GB of RAM and a 500 GB HDD is available in the US for around $300.

You should follow this link for more details, configurations and up-to-date prices at the time you’re reading this post.

Competition

The Dell Inspiron 11 3000, HP Stream X360 11, Acer Aspire R 11 or the Asus Transformer Book Flip TP200 are some of the alternatives you can consider over this Lenovo.

The Inspiron 11 3000 is the better of the pack, and only slightly more expensive. A Pentium N3540 configuration with 4 GB of RAM and a 500 GB HDD has a list price of $450, but you can find it for around $400 online. $450 on the other hand can buy you a faster Core i3 configuration. Compared to the Yoga 300 11, the Inspiron packs a much improved IPS display and a larger 43 Wh battery.

The Acer Aspire R 11 (review) is built on a newer Braswell hardware platform and packs a 50 Wh battery, so it’s an upgrade both in terms of performance and battery life. Buyers will have to settle for the heavy body (3.5 lbs) and the poor TN screen though. The cheapest models start at $250, but that’s for a configuration with 2 GB of RAM and only 32 GB of eMMC storage (which cannot be upgraded). Higher specked models sell for over $350. You’ll find more about it here.

The HP Stream x360 11 sells for under $300, but that’s for a Celeron configuration with 2 GB of RAM and 32 GB of eMMC storage. It gets a TN screen and a 29 Wh battery, but it’s also available in a few lively colors that might appeal to some of you. The Stream is only an alternative to the base version of the Yoga 300 11, but Lenovo also sells a Pavillion X360 11-inch model with Core i3 hardware for around $450.

Last but not least there’s the Asus Transformer Book Flip TP200SA, another Braswell laptop, but lighter than all the others in this class. It tips the scale at 2.6 lbs and includes a 38 Wh battery and a HD IPS screen. The base model with a Pentium N3050 processor, 4 GB of RAM and 64 GB of SSD storage sells for around $350. You’ll find more about the TP200 via this link.

The Dell Inspiron 11 3000 (left), HP Stream 11 x360 (middle) and the Asus Transformer Book Flip TP200 (right)

Wrap-up

At the end of the day, if you only have $300 or less to spend for an 11-inch convertible, the Lenovo Yoga 300 11 is going to be one of your better options, as the base model includes 4 GB of RAM and plenty of storage space in this budget. You’ll also get a well built and fairly nice looking machine, a good keyboard and a proper IO.

If you only have $300 to spend for a convertible, the Yoga 300 11 should definitely be on your list

However, the Yoga 300 11 looses major points when it comes to the screen and battery, which are both crucial aspects on an ultraportable device these days, at least in my book. Thus, if you can expand your budget to $350-$400, there are better options for you out there, as you saw in the previous chapter, with IPS displays, larger batteries and in some cases even updated hardware.

In your search for the perfect compact convertible you should also go through this list of the best ultraportables of the moment, or this selection of my favorite 11 inchers. And if you have any questions or anything to add to this point, get in touch in the comments section.

  • Share this article:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

www.ultrabookreview.com

Lenovo Yoga 300 Specs & Price - 2-in-1 - Nigeria Technology Guide

Lenovo Yoga 300 is a portable convertible laptop that offers the flexibility of a tablet with the versatility of a laptop. Being a member of Lenovo’s Yoga line, it offers the standard 360 degree flip and fold design offering the usual four modes.

Jumia.com.ng₦34,500.00 View Offers Konga.com₦38,500.00 View Offers

Hardware & Software

The Lenovo Yoga 300 is a portable device with a brilliant looking 11.6-inch touchscreen display. The display sports 1366 x 768 pixels resolution with anti-glare and is bright 200-nits.

Featured Video

The Lenovo Yoga 300 is measures 21.8 mm and weighs just 1.39 kg. The device is a full-fledged laptop, but you can fold or flip the keyboard or display the whole 360 degrees to use it like a tablet.

You can also stand it or use it like a tent, which are both great for handfree viewing of movies, tutorials, or presentations. It also features stereo speakers with Dolby Home Theater for a great sound quality.

Lenovo Yoga 300 is powered by the latest Intel Pentium processors to deliver needed performance for both work and play. The 2-in-1 convertible runs on either Windows 8.1 or Windows 10.

For connectivity, Lenovo Yoga 300 offers two USB 2.0 ports, one USB 3.0 port, and an HMDI output port.

Pricing and availability

Lenovo Yoga 300 2-in-1 laptop is now available in Nigeria. Lenovo Yoga 300 price in Nigeria starts at around 89,000 Naira, depending on your location and the configuration of the laptop.

Here are a few specs of the Lenovo Yoga 300 2-in-1 Notebook:

General Features

  • OS: Windows 8.1 or Windows 10 (Win 8.1 models upgradeable to Windows 10)
  • Processor: Intel Pentium Processor (dual-core or quad-core)
  • GPU: Intel HD Graphics
  • Memory: from 2GB RAM, up to 8GB RAM
  • Colours: Black
  • Dimension: 299 x 209 x 21.8 mm
  • Weight: 1.39 kg

Display & Keyboard

  • Display: 11.6-inch Touch Display, 1366 x 768 pixels
  • Keyboard: Full sized island-style keyboard
  • Pointing Device: Touchpad

Storage

  • Built-in Storage: up to 64GB eMMC or up to 500 GB SHDD, or up to 1TB HDD
  • Optical Storage: No
  • Bundled Cloud Storage: –

Ports & Connectivity

  • Webcam: Yes, HD Webcam
  • USB 3.0: Yes, 1 port
  • USB 2.0: Yes, 2 port
  • HDMI: Yes, 1 port
  • DisplayPort: No
  • VGA: No
  • Ethernet (RJ-45): Yes
  • SD Slot: Yes, 1 slot
  • Mic/Headphone: Yes
  • WLAN: Yes, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n or ac
  • Bluetooth: Yes, Bluetooth 4.0
  • Mobile Broadband: No

Other Features

  • VeriFace Pro
  • Lenovo OneKey Optimizer
  • Lenovo DOit Apps
  • 2 x 1.2W Stereo speakers with Dolby Home Theater
  • Four Modes: Laptop, Tablet, Tent, Stand

Battery

  • Battery: 30 WHr Battery
  • Use Time: up to 5 hours

More on Lenovo

www.naijatechguide.com


Смотрите также