Geforce ti 650 boost


Features

Kepler GPU Architecture NVIDIA's Kepler GPU architecture has been designed from the ground up not just for maximum performance in the latest DirectX 11 games, but optimal performance per watt. The new SMX streaming multiprocessor is twice as efficient as the prior generation and the new geometry engine draws triangles twice as fast. The result is world class performance and the highest image quality in an elegant and power efficient graphics card.

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NVIDIA GPU Boost Up until now, GPUs have operated at a fixed clock speed when playing 3D games, even if they have the potential to run faster. GPU Boost intelligently monitors graphics work load and increases the clock speed whenever possible. The result is that the GPU always performs at its peak and you get the highest framerate possible.

NVIDIA SLI® Technology1 Used by the most demanding gamers worldwide, SLI lets you link up to two GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST together for astounding performance. And with NVIDIA’s track record for fast and frequent software updates, you’ll not only get the best performance in existing games, but future games too.

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NVIDIA Adaptive Vertical Sync Nothing is more distracting than framerate stuttering and screen tearing. The first tends to occur when framerates are low, the second when framerates are high. Adaptive V-Sync is a smarter way to render frames. At high framerates, V-sync is enabled to eliminate tearing, at low frame rates, it's disabled to minimize stuttering. It gets rid of distractions so you can get on with gaming.

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NVIDIA Surround with Up To Four Monitors2 Nothing is as breathtaking as playing your favorite games across three monitors. At 5760 x 1080, the expanded field of view fully engages human peripheral vision and provides for the most immersive experience in racing and flight simulators. Add in a fourth display to keep tabs on chat, email or web while you are gaming.

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TXAA AntiAliasing Antialiasing helps to smooth out jagged lines in games. Existing techniques like MSAA are effective at removing jagged lines in still images but struggle with crawling and shimmering artifacts when the player is in motion. TXAA is a new antialiasing mode that combines MSAA, temporal filtering, and post processing for the highest edge quality and minimal shimmering during gameplay.

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NVIDIA 3D Vision® Ready3 NVIDIA 3D Vision brings a fully immersive, stereoscopic 3D experience to the PC. A combination of high-tech wireless glasses and advanced software, 3D Vision transforms hundreds of PC games into full stereoscopic 3D. Get up to 2x monitor and keyboard brightness with NVIDIA 3D LightBoost technology4. In addition, you can enjoy 3D movies and 3D digital photographs from 3DVisionLive.com in eye popping, crystal-clear quality.

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NVIDIA PhysX® Technology Full support for NVIDIA PhysX technology, enabling a totally new class of physical gaming interaction for a more dynamic and realistic experience with GeForce.

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1- A GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST GPU must be paired with another GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST GPU (graphics card manufacturer can be different) with the same frame buffer size. SLI requires sufficient system cooling and a compatible powersupply. Visit www.geforce.com/sli for more information and a listing of SLI-Certified components. 2 – NVIDIA 3D Vision Surround requires 3D Vision glasses and three matching 3D Vision-Ready displays. In addition a DisplayPort to Dual-link DVI adapter may be required to connect one of the 3D Vision Surround monitors. See www.nvidia.com/surround for more information. 3 – NVIDIA 3D Vision requires 3D Vision glasses and a 3D Vision-Ready monitor. See www.nvidia.com/3dvision for more information. 4 - Requires NVIDIA 3D LightBoost monitor or notebook.

www.geforce.com

GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost & SLI Performance Review

Last September saw the release of the first GeForce GTX 650 graphics card. Aiming at the gamer on a budget, the card sold for just $110, however with memory bandwidth of just 80GB/s -- less than the 3-year old GTX 460 -- it came up short of becoming a noteworthy launch.

A month later, we saw the release of the GeForce GTX 650 Ti ($150). Thanks to the use of the GK106 architecture, it offered considerably better performance as the larger die allowed for a more aggressive core configuration, improving texture fill rates by 75%. The GTX 650 Ti became our favorite $100 - $150 graphics card last year, as it thrashed the Radeon HD 7770.

Meanwhile, AMD held on to the $150 - $200 price range with the Radeon HD 7850. Then last month AMD decided to attack the $150 price point with a new HD 7790 GPU, but the reaction didn't take long to arrive.

Just a week later Nvidia officially countered by releasing the poorly named GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost, now the third graphics card to carry the GTX 650 name.

At $170, the GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost sits between the Radeon HD 7790 and the 7850. In terms of performance, we actually expect the GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost to be a lot faster than the GTX 650 Ti, even when it's based on the same GK106 architecture.

Although the GPU's core configuration has remained much the same with only a slight increase in ROPs, both core and memory clock speeds have been increased. Nvidia has also added a boost clock feature which can automatically overclock the GTX 650 Ti Boost when temperatures allow it.

More important than all of the above, the memory bus has been widened from a very limiting 128-bit to 192-bit, which effectively increases memory bandwidth by 67%.

Gainward has been quick to jump aboard the GTX 650 Ti Boost train, offering a special Golden Sample version which is what we'll be testing today. The GS version upgrades the cooler, and the card itself is available in 1GB or 2GB flavors.

As anticipated, we are testing SLI so we have lined up a pair of GTX 650 Ti Boost GS Dual graphics cards, comparing them to a range of competing graphics card configurations, including Crossfire Radeon 7850s.

Testing Methodology

Reporting average fps (frames per second) using Fraps is how things have been done for... well, forever. It's a fantastic metric in the sense that it's easy to record and easy to understand. But it doesn't tell the whole story, as The Tech Report and others have shown.

To get a fuller picture, it's increasingly apparent that you need to factor in a card's frame latency, which looks at how quickly each frame is delivered. Regardless of how many frames a graphics card produces on average in 60 seconds, if it can't deliver them all at roughly the same speed, you might see more brief jittery points with one GPU over another -- something we've witnessed but didn't fully understand.

Assuming two cards deliver equal average frame rates, the one with lowest stable frame latency is going to offer the smoothest picture, and that's a pretty important detail to consider if you're about to drop a wad of cash. As such, we'll be including this information from now on by measuring how long in milliseconds it takes cards to render each frame individually and then graphing that in a digestible way.

We'll be using the latency-focused 99th percentile metric, which looks at 99% of results recorded within X milliseconds, and the lower that number is, the faster and smoother the performance is overall. By removing 1% of the most extreme results, it's possible to filter anomalies that might have been caused by other components. Again, kudos to The Tech Report and other sites like PCPer for shining a light on this issue.

Test System Specs

  • Intel Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition (3.30GHz)
  • x4 2GB G.Skill DDR3-1600(CAS 8-8-8-20)
  • Asrock X79 Extreme11 (Intel X79)
  • OCZ ZX Series (1250W)
  • Crucial m4 512GB (SATA 6Gb/s)
  • Gainward GeForce GTX 660 Ti (2048MB)
  • Gainward GeForce GTX 660 (2048MB) SLI
  • Gainward GeForce GTX 660 (2048MB)
  • Gainward GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost (2048MB) SLI
  • Gainward GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost (2048MB)
  • Gigabyte GeForce GTX 650 Ti (2048MB)
  • HIS Radeon HD 7950 (3072MB)
  • HIS Radeon HD 7870 (2048MB)
  • HIS Radeon HD 7850 (2048MB) Crossfire
  • HIS Radeon HD 7850 (2048MB)
  • HIS Radeon HD 7770 (2048MB)
  • HIS Radeon HD 7790 (1024MB) Crossfire
  • HIS Radeon HD 7790 (1024MB)
  • HIS Radeon HD 7750 (1024MB)
  • Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 64-bit
  • Nvidia Forceware 314.22
  • AMD Catalyst 13.3

www.techspot.com

UserBenchmark: Nvidia GTX 650 Ti Boost

Average fps @ 1080p with maximum detail settings for 1 popular games:

League of Legends: 131 fps

The number of benchmark samples for this model as a percentage of all 20,613,251 GPUs tested.

GPU
GTX 650 Ti BoostNvidia  £106Bench 18%, 8,697 samples1x
EDIT WITH CUSTOM PC BUILDER Value: 38% - Below average Total price: £387
How Fast Is Your GPU? (Bench your build) Size up your PC in less than a minute.

Welcome to our freeware PC speed test tool. UserBenchmark will test your PC and compare the results to other users with the same components. You can quickly size up your PC, identify hardware problems and explore the best upgrades.

UserBenchmark of the month
Gaming Desktop Workstation CPU GPU SSD HDD RAM USB
How it works
  • - Download and run UserBenchMark.
  • - CPU tests include: integer, floating and string.
  • - GPU tests include: six 3D game simulations.
  • - Drive tests include: read, write, sustained write and mixed IO.
  • - RAM tests include: single/multi core bandwidth and latency.
  • - Reports are generated and presented on userbenchmark.com.
  • - Identify the strongest components in your PC.
  • - See speed test results from other users.
  • - Compare your components to the current market leaders.
  • - Explore your best upgrade options with a virtual PC build.
  • - Compare your in-game FPS to other users with your hardware.
  • - Share your opinion by voting.

gpu.userbenchmark.com

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost Review: Bringing Balance To The Force

To get our weekly geekiness quota out of the way early, the desktop video card industry is a lot like The Force. There are two sides constantly at odds with each other for dominance of the galaxy/market, and balance between the two sides is considered one of the central tenants of the system. Furthermore when the system isn’t in balance something bad happens, whether it’s galactic domination or uncompetitive video card prices and designs.

To that end – and to bring things back to a technical discussion – while AMD and NVIDIA’s ultimate goals are to rule the video card market, in practice they serve to keep each other in check and keep the market as a whole balanced. This is accomplished by their doing what they can to offer similarly competitive video cards at most price points, particularly the sub-$300 market where the bulk of all video card sales take place. On the other hand when that balance is disrupted by the introduction of a new GPU and/or new video card, AMD and NVIDIA will try to roll out new products to restore that balance.

This brings us to the subject of today’s launch. Friday saw the launch of AMD’s Radeon HD 7790, a $149 entry-level 1080p card based on their new Bonaire GPU. AMD had for roughly the last half-year been operating with a significant price and performance gap between their 7770 and 7850 products, leaving the mid-$100 market open to NVIDIA’s GTX 650 Ti. With the 7790 AMD finally has a GTX 650 Ti competitor and more, and left unchallenged this would mean AMD would control the market between $150 and $200.

NVIDIA for their part has no interest in letting AMD take that piece of the market without a fight, and as such will be immediately countering with a new video card: the GTX 650 Ti Boost. Launching today, the GTX 650 Ti Boost is based on the same GK106 GPU as the GTX 650 Ti and GTX 660, and is essentially a filler card to bridge the gap between them. By adding GPU boost back into the mix and using a slightly more powerful core configuration, NVIDIA intends to plug their own performance gap and at the same time counter AMD’s 7850 and 7790 before the latter even reaches retail. It’s never quite that simple of course, but as we’ll see the GTX 650 Ti Boost does indeed bring some balance back to the Force.

NVIDIA GPU Specification Comparison
  GTX 660 GTX 650 Ti Boost GTX 650 Ti GTX 550 Ti
Stream Processors

960

768

768

192

Texture Units

80

64

64

32

ROPs

24

24

16

16

Core Clock

980MHz

980MHz

925MHz

900MHz

Boost Clock

1033MHz

1033MHz

N/A

N/A

Memory Clock

6.008GHz GDDR5

6.008GHz GDDR5

5.4GHz GDDR5

4.1GHz GDDR5

Memory Bus Width

192-bit

192-bit

128-bit

192-bit

VRAM

2GB

1GB/2GB

1GB/2GB

1GB

FP64

1/24 FP32

1/24 FP32

1/24 FP32

1/12 FP32

TDP

140W

134W

110W

116W

GPU

GK106

GK106

GK106

GF116

Architecture

Kepler

Kepler

Kepler

Fermi

Transistor Count

2.54B

2.54B

2.54B

1.17B

Manufacturing Process

TSMC 28nm

TSMC 28nm

TSMC 28nm

TSMC 40nm

Launch Price $229 $149/$169 $149 $149

When NVIDIA produced the original GTX 650 Ti, they cut down their GK106 GPU by a fairly large degree to reach the performance and power levels we see with that card. From 5 SMXes and 3 ROP/Memory partitions, GK106 was cut down to 4 SMXes and 2 ROP partitions, along with having GPU boost removed and overall clockspeeds lowered. In practice this left a pretty big gap between the GTX 650 Ti and the GTX 660, one which AMD’s 7850 and now their 7790 serve to fill.

Despite the name GTX 650 Ti Boost, it’s probably more meaningful to call NVIDIA’s new card the GTX 660 light. The GTX 650 Ti Boost restores many of the cuts NVIDIA made for the GTX 650 Ti; this latest 650 has the core clockspeed, memory clockspeed, GPU boost functionality, and ROP partitions of the GTX 660. In fact the only thing differentiating the GTX 660 from the GTX 650 Ti Boost is a single SMX; the GTX 650 Ti Boost is still a 4 SMX part, and this is what makes it a 650 in NVIDIA’s product stack (note that this means GTX 650 Ti Boost parts will similarly have either 2 or 3 GPCs depending on which SMX is cut). Because clockspeeds are identical to the GTX 660, the GTX 650 Ti Boost will be shipping at 980MHz for the base clock, 1033MHz for the boost clock, and 6GHz for the memory clock.

The result of this configuration is that the GTX 650 Ti Boost is much more powerful than the name would let on, and in practice is closer to the GTX 660 in performance than it is the GTX 650 Ti. Compared to the GTX 650 Ti, the GTX 650 TI Boost has just 106% of the shading/texturing/geometry throughput, but due in large part to the return of the 3rd ROP partition, ROP throughput has been boosted to 159%. Meanwhile thanks to the combination of higher memory clocks and the full 192bit memory bus, memory bandwidth has been increased to 166% of the GTX 650 Ti’s. Or compared to a GTX 660, the GTX 650 Ti Boost has 100% the ROP throughput, 100% the memory bandwidth, and 80% of the shading/texturing/geometry performance. The end result being that in memory/ROP bound scenarios performance will trend close to the GTX 660, while in shader/texture/geometry bound situations performance will easily exceed the GTX 650 Ti’s performance by 6-16%, depending on where GPU boost settles at.

Of course GTX 660-like performance does come with some tradeoffs. While the GTX 650 Ti was a 110W TDP part, the GTX 650 Ti Boost will be a 134W part, just shy of the 140W GTX 660. The GTX 650 Ti Boost runs at the same clockspeeds and the same voltages with the same amount of RAM as the GTX 660, meaning the power savings are limited to whatever power is saved from fusing off that SMX, which in practice will not be all that much. Even by NVIDIA's own reckoning they're minimal. So what we’re effectively looking at is a somewhat slower GTX 660 operating at near-GTX 660 power levels.

Driving home the point that the GTX 650 Ti Boost is a reconfigured GTX 660, with the TDP being held at 140W NVIDIA and their partners will be recycling their GTX 660 designs for NVIDIA’s new card. Our reference card is identical to our GTX 660 reference card, and the same can be said for many partner designs. Partners need to provide the same power and cooling to the GTX 650 Ti Boost as they do the GTX 660, so there’s little point in rolling new designs and in fact this helps NVIDIA and their partners get the GTX 650 Ti Boost to market sooner.

Gallery: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost

Gallery: GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost: Partner Cards

Moving on to the launch and pricing details, as with NVIDIA’s other GK106 card launches, this is a pure virtual launch with partners rolling their custom designs from day one. Partners will be shipping both stock clocked and overclocked cards, and the mix should be very similar to what we saw with the GTX 660’s launch. Unexpectedly, partners will also have the option of going with 1GB or 2GB cards. 1GB cards are a late addition to NVIDIA’s lineup, in what appears to be an attempt to get down to price parity with AMD’s 7790. Our reference card is a 2GB model, and like other mixed cards like AMD’s 7850 we expect most GTX 650 Ti Boost cards to be 2GB cards.

In something of a coup for NVIDIA, 2GB GTX 650 Ti Boost cards will be hitting stores this week at $169, nearly a week ahead of the 7790. So despite launching second in this latest scuffle, NVIDIA will be the first to hit the market. Meanwhile 1GB cards will arrive later, hitting the market in early April at $149. Overclocked cards will of course carry their own premiums.

The competition for the GTX 650 Ti Boost will include a number of cards from both NVIDIA and AMD. The tight pricing of the market between $149 and $199 means that the GTX 650 Ti Boost will in practice be pulling double-duty as a 7790 and a 7850 competitor. Priced at $149, the later to arrive 1GB cards are the true 7790 competitor in every sense of the word.  Meanwhile with the 2GB cards launching at $169 they’re more akin to a 7850 competitor, something NVIDIA doesn’t hesitate to point this out.

In any case, the GTX 650 Ti Boost will be boxed in by the GTX 650 Ti below it at around $130, meanwhile above it will be the 7850 2GB at around $185 and the GTX 660 at around $200. Ultimately NVIDIA has to be sure to cover $149 to go up directly against the 7790, but if you can afford to spend a little more than $149, then between factory overclocked cards and new models there’s a different card at every $10.

Finally, like AMD, NVIDIA will be extending their promotional bundling to their latest card. The GTX 650 Ti Boost will quality for the same $75 in free-to-play game credits as the GTX 650 Ti, split up as $25 for World of Tanks, $25 for Hawken, and $25 for Planetside 2.

www.anandtech.com

Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB Review

1 - Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB Review 2 - Test Setup 3 - Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB - Battlefield 3 Performance 4 - Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB - Crysis 3 Performance 5 - Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB - Skyrim Performance 6 - Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB - The Witcher 2 Performance 7 - Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB - Unigine Heaven 3.0 Benchmark 8 - Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB - Power and Thermals 9 - Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB - Overclocking 10 - Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB - Performance Analysis and Conclusion Next Manufacturer: Nvidia UK Price (as reviewed): £144.78 (inc VAT) US Price (as reviewed): Approx. $175 (ex Tax)

Just days after AMD decided to plug a gap in the price versus performance scale of its graphics hardware with the Radeon HD 7790 1GB, Nvidia is doing the same with the newly released GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB. Like the new AMD card, the mid-range GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB is designed primarily for gamers playing at 1,920 x 1,080. Its launch comes as little surprise, not just because of recent rumours, but because of the large and long standing gap (in both price and performance) in the company's mid-range product line between the underwhelming £100 GTX 650 Ti 1GB and the dearer GTX 660 2GB.

Click to enlarge Prices for the new card are set to start from around £144, pitching it firmly against AMD's HD 7850 2GB. We've previously recommended the 1GB SKU of the HD 7850 to those sticking solely to 1080p gaming, but AMD has recently informed us that this version of the card is soon to be discontinued, and as 2GB models can be found for close to £140, Nvidia's new card will be well positioned if it can outpace the competition from AMD. Or, at least, it would be, were it not for the fact that GTX 660 2GB cards have fallen quite drastically in price recently, as these can now also be found for a little over £140 themselves. As with the regular GTX 650 Ti 1GB, the GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB is based on a cut down version of the 28nm Kepler GK106 GPU that's found in the GTX 660 2GB and consists of 2.54 billion transistors. There are either two GPCs divided into two SMs each, or three GPCs divided into two, one and one SM (as pictured), with the end result being a total of 768 stream processors and 64 texture units, with no difference in performance between the different chip layouts. Click to enlarge That's where the similarities with the original GTX 650 Ti 1GB end, however, as the hack and slash job hasn't been quite so vicious with the new card, meaning that in every other way it's actually the same as a GTX 660 2GB. For starters, Nvidia's new mid-range card comes with 2GB of GDDR5 memory as standard. Also, compared to the normal GTX 650 Ti 1GB, the Boost card has an extra 64-bit memory controller, giving it a 192-bit memory interface and an ROP count of 24, up from 16. The Boost card's clock speeds have also been brought up to match the GTX 660 2GB, with a 5 percent increase to the core clock speed bringing it up from the GTX 650 Ti 1GB's 925MHz to 980Mhz. The keen eyed among you might also have guessed that Nvidia has added its GPU boost technology to the new card (who said hardware manufacturers weren't good at naming products?). The GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB ships with a guaranteed boost clock of 1,033Mhz, but we saw our sample hitting 1,071MHz in practice. Meanwhile, the memory is now clocked at a nice 6GHz, and this coupled with the extra memory controller increases the memory bandwidth to 144GB/sec, over two thirds more than the GTX 650 Ti 1GB. Click to enlarge While card designs will undoubtedly vary between Nvidia's board partners, the dual-slot reference sample measures 240mm in length. In fact, the reference design is essentially identical to that of the GTX 660 2GB, which is unsurprising given the similarities between them. A radial fan on top draws cool air in over the card's heatsink, and exhausts it through the rear I/O panel. The actual PCB is smaller than the length of the cooler, so it's reasonable to expect smaller versions of the card to be released which are more suited to small form factor builds. The card is equipped with a pair of dual-link DVI ports, a DisplayPort and an HDMI output, and, unlike the regular GTX 650 Ti 1GB, a single SLI connection too. Click to enlarge The memory chips are split across either side of the PCB, with four left exposed on the rear side. As with the GTX 660 2GB, 1GB of this memory is connected to one memory controller, with the remaining two controllers serving 512MB each. There are three power phases near the far side of the card for the GPU with an extra one for the memory, giving the card a total of 4+1 phase power. The VRMs also receive no direct cooling as they're not covered by the card's relatively small heatsink. Power is supplied through a single top-mounted 6-pin PCI-E connection, and the card has a TDP of 140W, again the same as the GTX 660 2GB.
  • Graphics processor Nvidia GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB, 980MHz boosting to 1,033MHz
  • Pipeline 768 stream processors, 64 texture units, 24 ROPs
  • Memory 2GB GDDR5, 6GHz effective
  • Bandwidth 144GB/sec, 192-bit interface
  • Compatibility DirectX 11.1, OpenGL 4.2
  • Outputs/Inputs HDMI, DisplayPort, DVI-I, DVI-D
  • Power connections 1 x 6-pin, top-mounted
  • Size 240mm, dual-slot

bit-tech.net

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost Review: Bringing Balance To The Force

Last but not least of course is our look at power, temperature, and noise. Because the GTX 650 Ti Boost is essentially a reconfigured GTX 660 there aren’t going to be any grand revelations here, but it will be useful to figure out just what the real-world power savings will be from fusing off that one SMX.

GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost Voltages
Ref GTX 650 Ti Boost Idle Ref GTX 650 Ti Boost Load Ref GTX 660 Load
0.887v 1.175v 1.175v

With a peak load voltage of 1.175v, the GTX 650 Ti Boost tops out at the same voltage as the rest of the boost-enabled Kepler family.

Up next, before we jump into our graphs let’s take a look at the average core clockspeed during our benchmarks. Because GTX 650 Ti Boost has the same TDP has the GTX 660 but at least marginally lower power consumption due to the disabled SMX, it’s in an interesting position where it has more headroom for boosting than its fully-enabled counterpart. As a result we’re seeing far less variability than what we saw with the GTX 660 when we reviewed it last year. With the exception of BF3, every game is sustained at the top boost bin of 1071MHz. Based on these results it would appear that in practice the GTX 650 Ti Boost operates at a marginally higher average clockspeed than the otherwise superior GTX 660.

GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost Average Clockspeeds
Max Boost Clock 1071MHz
DiRT:S

1071MHz

Shogun 2

1071MHz

Hitman

1071MHz

Sleeping Dogs

1071MHz

Crysis

1071MHz

Far Cry 3

1071MHz

Battlefield 3

1058MHz

Civilization V

1071MHz

FurMark 992MHz

Starting as always with idle power, 110W at idle is par for the course for most NVIDIA cards. With the reactivation of the 3rd ROP partition the GTX 650 Ti Boost gives up the slight advantage the GTX 650 Ti gained here.

Moving on to our first and arguably most important load power test we have BF3. Power consumption in BF3 scales slightly with performance due to the extra work required of the CPU to feed more frames to a video card, but it usually paints some clear trends and this is no exception. NVIDIA may only be giving the GTX 650 Ti Boost a official TDP 6W lower than the GTX 660, but it’s clear power consumption is at least a little bit lower than that; we’re seeing 289W at the wall versus 298W for the GTX 660. On the other hand these results are 28W higher than the GTX 650 Ti, and even 18W higher than the 7850, never mind the 7790. The GTX 650 Ti Boost’s performance here is well ahead of everything other than the GTX 660, so this jump in power consumption does come with a performance boost, but it serves as a reminder that there is a tradeoff to be made. In the case of the GTX 650 Ti Boost, we’re seeing it pull away a bit from the efficiency curve set by NVIDIA’s other products.

As for power consumption under FurMark, we’re seeing the more muted results for the GTX 650 Ti Boost. Here it’s roughly halfway between the GTX 650 Ti and GTX 660, and probably should be a bit higher still. The fact that there’s a difference (at the wall) of 27W between the GTX 660 and GTX 650 Ti Boost is more than we would except, and more than makes sense for cards that are identical except for a single fused off SMX. So we may also be seeing chip-to-chip variation play a part here. In any case, power consumption is also similar to the 7850, but this is one of those scenarios where we put more faith in the BF3 numbers than the FurMark numbers; NVIDIA appears to just outright be more aggressive on throttling here.

Utilizing the same cooler as the GTX 660, there’s no surprise here in seeing the GTX 650 Ti Boost hit the same 30C idle temperatures.

Similarly, our temperature results here closely parallel the GTX 660’s under load. The GTX 650 Ti Boost consumes a bit less power than the GTX 660, and doesn’t get quite as warm as a result. The large jump from the GTX 650 Ti comes as a bit of a shock to the eyes at first, but as the GTX 650 Ti Boost is a blower and one with a conservative fan curve at that, this is to be expected.

With FurMark we see temperatures go up, but for the most part things are consistent with what we saw under BF3. The larger gap between the GTX 650 Ti Boost and GTX 660 reflects the larger gap in power consumption we saw earlier.

Just as with idle temperatures, the same GPU on the same cooler means we’re looking at the same idle noise temperatures. The blower NVIDIA uses here is quite good, but it can’t compete with simple open-air coolers like the 7790’s.

There’s a clear cutoff here between the open-air coolers and the blowers. The GTX 650 Ti Boost is quite a bit faster than something like the 7790 here, but the difference in noise is remarkable. Some of NVIDIA’s partner cards should fare much better here as they pack open-air coolers, with the usual tradeoff of giving up being fully-exhausting coolers. Still, this is a reminder that the GTX 650 Ti Boost pulls back from the efficiency curve a bit; it’s about 15% slower than the GTX 660 but no quieter for it.

Finally we have load noise under FurMark. NVIDIA’s more aggressive throttling here means that our results don’t jump up to much from BF3. The GTX 650 Ti Boost does finally end up being a bit quieter than the GTX 660 due to the former’s lower power consumption, and this is the only time we see the GTX 650 Ti Boost gain an edge on the 7850 in power/temp/noise.

www.anandtech.com


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