G pad 8 lg


LG G Pad 8.0 LTE

Also known as LG V490, LG G Pad 8.0 4G

Network
Technology GSM / HSPA / LTE
2G bands GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900
3G bands HSDPA 850 / 900 / 1900 / 2100
  HSDPA 900 / 2100
4G bands LTE band 3(1800), 4(1700/2100), 7(2600), 20(800)
  LTE band 3(1800), 7(2600), 8(900), 20(800)
Speed HSPA 42.2/5.76 Mbps, LTE Cat4 150/50 Mbps
Launch
Announced 2014, August
Status Available. Released 2014, August
Body
Dimensions 210.8 x 124.2 x 10 mm (8.30 x 4.89 x 0.39 in)
Weight 344 g (12.13 oz)
SIM Micro-SIM
Display
Type IPS LCD capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size 8.0 inches, 187.6 cm2 (~71.6% screen-to-body ratio)
Resolution 800 x 1280 pixels, 16:10 ratio (~188 ppi density)
Protection Corning Gorilla Glass
Platform
OS Android 4.4.2 (KitKat), upgradable to 5.0.2 (Lollipop)
Chipset Qualcomm MSM8926 Snapdragon 400 (28 nm)
CPU Quad-core 1.2 GHz Cortex-A7
GPU Adreno 305
Memory
Card slot microSD, up to 32 GB (dedicated slot)
Internal 16GB 1GB RAM, 32GB 1GB RAM
Main Camera
Single 5 MP, AF
Features Panorama
Video [email protected]
Selfie camera
Single 1.3 MP
Video 720p
Sound
Loudspeaker Yes
3.5mm jack Yes
Features
Sensors Accelerometer, compass
Battery
  Non-removable Li-Ion 4200 mAh battery
Stand-by Up to 650 h (3G)
Misc
Colors Black, White, Luminous Orange, Luminous Blue
Models V49
Price About 240 EUR

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LG G Pad X 8.0

ALL VERSIONS

AT&T

T-MOBILE

For Global market

Launch
Announced 2016, June
Status Available. Released 2016, June
Body
Dimensions 210.8 x 121.9 x 7.9 mm (8.30 x 4.80 x 0.31 in)
Weight 309 g (10.90 oz)
SIM Nano-SIM
Display
Type IPS LCD capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size 8.0 inches, 185.6 cm2 (~72.2% screen-to-body ratio)
Resolution 1200 x 1920 pixels, 16:10 ratio (~283 ppi density)
Platform
OS Android 6.0.1 (Marshmallow)
Chipset Qualcomm MSM8939 Snapdragon 615 (28 nm)
CPU Octa-core (4x1.5 GHz Cortex-A53 & 4x1.0 GHz Cortex-A53)
GPU Adreno 405
Memory
Card slot microSD, up to 256 GB (dedicated slot)
Internal 16GB 2GB RAM, 32GB 2GB RAM
Main Camera
Single 5 MP, AF
Features Panorama
Video [email protected]
Selfie camera
Single 5 MP
Video
Sound
Loudspeaker Yes
3.5mm jack Yes
Comms
WLAN Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, dual-band, Wi-Fi Direct, DLNA, hotspot
Bluetooth 4.2, A2DP, LE
GPS Yes, with A-GPS, GLONASS
Radio No
USB microUSB 2.0
Features
Sensors Accelerometer, compass
Battery
  Non-removable Li-Ion 4800 mAh battery
Misc
Colors White/Gold
Models V520, V521
Price About 220 EUR

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LG G Pad 8.3 Review

Sections

Pros

  • Decent screen quality
  • Plenty of power available
  • Metal back feels good

Cons

  • Basic camera
  • Software needs some tweaking

Key Specifications

  • Review Price: £199.99
  • 8.3-inch 1,920 x 1,200 pixel IPS display
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 1.7GHz quad-core processor
  • 4,600mAh battery

The LG G Pad 8.3 is a small, fairly low-cost tablet. It offers a pretty compelling alternative option to the iPad mini Retina, while costing around £120 less.

There are some signs that this is not a top-tier tablet, but not enough to stop it from being a real bargain.

Note: Tesco is currently selling the LG G Pad 8.3 for £120 as part of its Easter Deals campaign. Details here.

LG G Pad 8.3 – Design

The LG G Pad 8.3 is a fairly affordable tablet, but its build quality is good. The top layer is toughened glass and the rear is a mix of aluminium and plastic. As virtually the whole area your hands come into contact with is metal, it has a similar cool and hard feel as an iPad mini.

Styling-wise, the LG G Pad isn’t quite on the same level. The dual speakers on the rear spoil the simplicity of the look a bit, and the mix of white and silver on the version we tested does look a little bit cheap. We think the black version looks better.

.

The power and volume buttons on the side are plastic rather than metal too. But once you consider the iPad mini and Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4 cost a good 60 per cent more, you can’t really complain.

The LG G Pad 8.3’s size also strikes a good balance between portability and screen size. It’s small enough to grasp comfortably side-to-side in one (adult-size) hand – which the Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4 isn’t really – and weighs just 338g. That is light enough for one-handed use, although this is clearly a device that works best when you get both hands involved.

Its hardware versatility is also remarkably good considering the £200 price. There’s a covered microSD memory card slot on the top edge of the LG G Pad 8.3 and, next to it, a little IR blaster. This lets the tablet function as a universal remote control. It’s pretty rare to find one of these in a sub-£200 tablet – the Nexus 7 doesn’t have one, for example.

The LG Pad 8.3 also has a much higher screen-to-tablet-size ratio than most current sub 10-inch devices. This is helped by the lack of soft keys, and it provides a more modern look than older tablets. At 8.3mm thick, it’s slim too. Aside from the white version looking a little cheap, there’s little to criticise here.

LG G Pad 8.3 – Screen

Its screen feels up-to-date too. As the LG G Pad 8.3 name suggests, it’s an 8.3-inch display.

This is a 16:10 widescreen panel, 1,920 x 1,200 in resolution. Although lower-res than the Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4 and less pixel-dense than the Nexus 7, it’s fairly sharp. Look close and you can discern single pixels, but it’s not a major issue in a low-cost tablet.

Basic image quality is fairly good thanks to the use of an IPS panel, which provides solid viewing angles. However, there are a few minor image quality issues.

Top brightness is just ok, and the contrast in bright areas of an image is not great, leading to pictures that don’t look as vibrant and as defined as they would do on a higher-grade screen. Colour reproduction is decent, but this lack of backlight control leads to images looking a tad washed out. Black levels are good enough, though.

LG G Pad 8.3 – Speakers

The tablet makes for a handy little personal video player, and this is also helped along by the stereo speakers. As they’re mounted on the back, you don’t get a clear stereo image, but the audio doesn’t clearly come from one end, as with some tablets.

Its sound experience is not great, though. The output is a little thin-sounding and at mid-to-high volumes, the back of the tablet vibrates. It feels a little odd.

Andrew Williams is a technology writer, who has contributed to Stuff, WIRED, TechRadar, T3, Wareable and, of course, Trusted Reviews. Here he test and reviews some of newest mobile, audio and camera d…

Unlike other sites, we thoroughly test every product we review. We use industry standard tests in order to compare features properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. We never, ever accept money to review a product. Tell us what you think - send your emails to the Editor.

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LG G Pad 8.0 Review

Sections

  • Page 1 LG G Pad 8.0 Review
  • Page 2 Camera, Battery Life and Verdict Review

Pros

  • Cheap
  • Boasts some excellent features
  • Superb battery life

Cons

  • Underpowered
  • Low-res screen
  • Camera is disappointing

Key Specifications

  • Review Price: £149.95
  • Android 4.4.2
  • 5-megapixel rear camera, 1.2-megapixel front camera
  • microSD card slot
  • Knock Code functionality
The LG G Pad 8.0 is an 8-inch Android tablet which slots neatly in between the G Pad 10.1 and the G Pad 7.0, which are also being launched at the same time. The internals are practically identical across all three devices, with a quad-core 1.2GHz Snapdragon CPU, 800 x 1280-pixel IPS screen, 1GB of RAM and 16GB of internal storage.

SEE ALSO: Best Tablets Round-up

LG G Pad 8.0 – Design and Screen

In the realm of Android, smaller 8-inch tablets are fast becoming the norm, with this particular screen size seeming to strike the perfect balance between portability, functionality and price for many consumers. The G Pad 8.0 has this 8-inch sector covered, and while its design’s hardly likely to set your pulse racing, it’s appealing enough.

The rear of the G Pad 8.0 is made of matte-effect plastic, which is reasonably grippy but soon becomes covered in unsightly thumbprints. Aside from the LG logo, camera lens and two speaker grilles, there’s little else of note around the back.

Unlike the G Pad 10.1, this smaller variant is designed to be held in portrait mode by default – the orientation of the LG logo and camera makes this abundantly clear. On the left-hand edge you’ll find the power button and volume controls, while the top edge is home to 3.5mm headphone socket, IR blaster and microSD card slot. The bottom edge is reserved solely for the Micro USB port.

The tablet’s 8-inch screen has a resolution of 800 x 1280 pixels, which delivers a pixel density of 189 ppi. The G Pad 10.1 has the same number of pixels stretched across a much larger screen, which results in blocky text and a general lack of definition. On the 8.0 model, the lack of sharpness isn’t quite as pronounced, but it’s still noticeable.

The IPS panel is bright and colourful, and affords excellent viewing angles. The only criticism we have is that, occasionally, some images can look a little washed out.

LG G Pad 8.0 – Software and Apps

LG’s been remarkably restrained when it comes to adding in too much bloatware on its G Pad range, each of which ships with Android 4.4.2. Some welcome unique features, such as Knock Code – which allows you to unlock your device by tapping a sequence on the touchscreen, even when the display is powered down – make the G Pad 8.0 stand out from its Android rivals.

Another nice element is the ability to run two applications in tandem, side by side. This is limited to a strict selection of apps and is arguably less useful on this tablet than it was on the larger-screened G Pad 10.1, but it’s something we found ourselves using more than we expected, even if it did cause the device to chug quite badly.Q Pair is an app which is unique to LG tablets and has been seen in older models, allowing you to link your phone to the G Pad in order to receive notifications such as text messages. This saves you having to reach for your handset when you’re using the tablet, and is one of those truly impressive little features which should be present in every device of this type.

Finally, there’s QuickRemote, which works with the tablet’s built-in IR blaster to enable control of your TV, DVD or Blu-ray player without having to search down the back of the sofa for the remote.

Refreshingly, it’s possible to uninstall some of the pre-loaded applications on the G Pad 8.0, which means you can free up more space for other downloads. Many manufacturers don’t offer this feature, so LG should be applauded for giving its customers the option.

Unlike other sites, we thoroughly test every product we review. We use industry standard tests in order to compare features properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. We never, ever accept money to review a product. Tell us what you think - send your emails to the Editor.

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LG G Pad 8.3 review

“At $350, the LG G Pad 8.3 is too expensive if stacked next to its top competitors, but if you have the money, it’s an absolutely fantastic tablet.”
  • Perfect 8-inch screen size
  • Comfortable to hold
  • MicroSD slot for extra storage
  • Powerful processor
  • Great all around tablet
  • More expensive than top competitors
  • Rear speakers are muffled and tinny
  • Like Samsung, LG clutters Android with too many apps
  • Seams around screen are too flexible

Eight inches is the perfect size for a tablet. We’ve been saying it ever since the first Galaxy Tab 8.9 impressed us back in 2011. It took two years of annoyingly bad designs to finally get us here, but 8 inches is now officially a size, and we couldn’t be happier. LG’s G Pad 8.3 joins Apple’s iPad Mini, Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 8.0, and Samsung’s Galaxy Note 8.0 in the mid-size tablet category, if such a thing really exists.

In all honesty, if you’re in the market for a great small tablet, then you’re also looking at the Kindle Fire HDX and Nexus 7. Though they have smaller 7-inch screens, the experience of using them is almost identical.

Does the G Pad and its $350 price tag have what it takes to compete with the $330 iPad Mini, and the $230 Nexus 7? Let’s find out.

Great look, weak sound

We’ve said it before, but LG stepped up its game in 2012 with the Optimus G and it hasn’t looked back. From the Nexus 4 to the LG Optimus G Pro, and the new LG G2, it’s continued producing fantastic devices from a design perspective. As LG’s first tablet in years, the G Pad 8.3 is thin, relatively light, and built with a brushed aluminum and plastic shell. LG may have left the tablet market for a while, but it didn’t stop paying attention. This tablet looks great.

The G Pad 8.3 has a slightly larger screen than the iPad Mini but thanks to a thin bezel on the sides, it’s easier to hold in one hand than Apple’s miniature tablet, which is great.

Button placement on the G Pad is typical. You can hold it in landscape (horizontally), but the power and volume buttons are best accessed if you hold it in portrait (vertically). Both buttons are toward the top of the right side. If you’ve used a Nexus 7 or iPad, nothing will surprise you here. The buttons are easy to access and press.

What may surprise you is the fun little MicroSD card on the top of the tablet. Few smaller tablets have expandable memory these days, so it’s nice to see MicroSD included. The Infrared (IR) blaster is also helpful if you plan to use your tablet as a remote control for your TV. The charge port is at the bottom and will accept any Micro USB chord.

Playing music on the G Pad’s rear-facing speakers is painful. It comes out tinny, and reverberates inside the tablet’s shell.

We have two complaints. The first is with the speakers. We’re happy to have stereo sound, but playing music on the G Pad’s rear-facing speakers is painful. It comes out tinny, and reverberates inside the shell of the tablet instead of escaping from the two thin recessed speakers. Trying to understand dialogue in a TV show on an app like Hulu is difficult as well. You often have to turn the volume almost up to max to understand what people are saying, but then it’s too loud. Placing the Pad down on your legs or on a surface will easily mute your sound.

We also noticed that the seam between the screen and shell is wider than usual. We could easily flex and pull the plastic portion of the shell a millimeter or so away from the screen. This doesn’t seem like much, but a wider seam can mean trouble when it comes to dust or water. Hopefully this is an issue LG addresses in its final production models.

Aside from some minor sound complaints and a shell that doesn’t seem well glued to its screen, the G Pad is a stellar little tablet. It has a ton of screen space for its size, and is thin and light enough to match any competitor.

LG brings its Android interface to the big screen

The G Pad doesn’t run a pure version of Android, or the newest version (our model ran 4.2, not the new 4.3), but we have few complaints about LG’s take on Android. If you’ve used the LG G2, or the Optimus G, then you know what you’re getting into. Just take those interfaces and increase the screen size. The G Pad has a full 1080p HD screen, making it possible to have rows of six icons (compare that to 4 on the iPad Mini) on your home screen. If you’re a home screen optimizer, you have more to work with. If you aren’t, well: try out Aviate. It works great on the G Pad.

All of LG’s staple features are here. QSlide lets you open up little mini apps on top of your desktop and manipulate how transparent they appear; QuickMemo lets you draw on the screen with your finger; and LG’s cool new KnockOn feature lets you turn the screen on and off with a double tap of your finger. KnockOn is a small, but incredibly useful way to turn your tablet on without having to reach for the power button.

Other than that, it all works well enough. Because it has access to the Google Play Store, any app you may want to install on the G Pad is easily accessible – about a million of them. The main weakness of the Kindle Fire HDX is app selection. Because Amazon chooses to only let its tablet access its own Amazon Appstore, there is a much smaller selection of games and software available. This isn’t the case with the G Pad. It can run any Android app.

Like Samsung, LG packs its Android devices with unique features and tons of apps, so prepare for a little clutter. Savvy users can easily go into Settings and disable apps that they don’t like (disabling an app will make it disappear from the apps list), but just know that this isn’t a Nexus tablet. If you want a no-frills, pure experience, you’re going to want Google’s Nexus 7.

Overall, we’re impressed with the G Pad’s interface. It’s a little feature heavy and can appear cluttered, but it looks nice and will get the job done. And if you don’t like it, there are many alternative home screens you can download from the Google Play Store.

Powerful little guy

The LG G Pad 8.3 isn’t the most powerful tablet we’ve used, but it’s up there. The Kindle Fire HDX leads other devices thanks to its 2.2GHz Snapdragon 800 processor, but the G Pad is no slouch. In a Quadrant benchmark test, the 1.7GHz Snapdragon 600 processor inside the G Pad pulled in as score of 11,700. For comparison, the Nexus 7 scored about 5,400 and the Kindle Fire logged 20,500. In all honesty, though, we found all three tablets plenty powerful.

The LG G Pad 8.3 isn’t the most powerful tablet we’ve used, but it’s up there.

Aside from the 1.7GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 processor, LG is packing 2GB of RAM, 16GB of internal storage (ROM), an 8.3-inch 1920 x 1200 pixel LCD screen, a 5-megapixel rear camera, a 1.3-megapixel front-facing webcam, and a MicroSD card if you need a little more storage. It also runs Android 4.2 Jelly Bean. We hope that LG will update it to Android 4.3 at some point soon, but no update is yet available.

Battery performance was about average. The G Pad has a 4,600mAh battery inside it and seemed to last about the average 10-11 hour lifespan we expect from a tablet. Impressively, LG’s tablet always met our expectations. During a week of heavy use, it always made it through the day with at least 30 percent battery by night.

Camera

Please don’t buy a tablet if you want to take good photos. You’re going to look like an idiot whipping out a giant tablet to snap your shots, but more importantly, you’re not going to end up with good shots. Most smartphones exceed the performance of tablet cameras because people demand a good camera on their phone. On a tablet, the camera is often an afterthought. LG has included a decent shooter on the G Pad, but it won’t do anything that your phone can’t do better.

The G Pad has a 5-megapixel camera with an F2.6 size aperture. It does well enough in outdoor and well-lit areas, but the sensor adapts to changing light levels slowly and does not pick up low light as well as the iPad Mini. Apple’s tablet outperformed LG’s in most shooting conditions. Compare it to a Samsung tablet or the Nexus 7, and the G Pad is highly competitive.

Conclusion

So, the G Pad 8.3 has weak sound, but other than that it’s a very competitive tablet. So it comes down to this: The G Pad has a bigger screen than the Nexus 7, doubles its processing performance, and has a nice MicroSD card slot if you want more than 16GB of memory. You will pay $120 for these upgrades. If that math works for you, then go for it.

The G Pad is $20 more than the iPad Mini. For that $20, you get a slightly larger screen with a much higher resolution, Google’s Android OS (though iOS is fantastic), and a MicroSD slot for expanded memory. To be fair though, iOS is a fantastic operating system with a great app ecosystem and the iPad Mini has better speakers and a slightly better camera than the G Pad.

The Kindle Fire has inferior button placement and far fewer apps available to it than the G Pad, but is much more powerful. Then again, what good is power if you have no games or apps that take advantage of it?

At $350, the LG G Pad 8.3 is too expensive if stacked next to its top competitors, but if you have the money, it’s an absolutely fantastic tablet.

Highs

  • Perfect 8-inch screen size
  • Comfortable to hold
  • MicroSD slot for extra storage
  • Powerful processor
  • Great all around tablet

Lows

  • More expensive than top competitors
  • Rear speakers are muffled and tinny
  • Like Samsung, LG clutters Android with too many apps
  • Seams around screen are too flexible
Editors' Recommendations

www.digitaltrends.com

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