Amd rx 480 8gb


AMD RX 480

Average fps @ 1080p with maximum detail settings for 12 popular games:

The number of benchmark samples for this model as a percentage of all 20,616,589 GPUs tested.

GPU
RX 480AMD  £172Bench 50%, 134,122 samples1,514x
EDIT WITH CUSTOM PC BUILDER Value: 44% - Average Total price: £479
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AMD Radeon RX 480 8GB review

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Alright, so there she is; the Radeon RX 480 card we received is a reference 8GB version with a single-fan heatpipe slash radiator design cooler. It has just one PCIe PEG power connector (6-pin). The card has been designed to be a nice match for Full HD gaming, up-to 1080P and even 1440P. 

AMD is clearly positioning these cards as a great alternative for 2560x1440 gaming as well, so we will place a focus on that in the review. In our findings the card is faster compared to the competition's GeForce GTX 970, and starting at 199 USD for the 4GB version that's not a bad position to be in. Obviously there's more to check out other than performance, we'll have a peek at PCB heat levels, GPU temperatures as well as noise levels.    

 The Radeon RX 480 (reference) is armed with either 4 or 8 GB graphics memory which will be clocked at 8.0 Gbps / 256-bit to give you a little more leash with the higher resolutions and image quality settings. The reference clocked product will run with clock frequencies up-to 1267 MHz on its 2304 shader processors, this model is indeed clocked at 1267 MHz (dynamic boost) for you with that promised 8 Gbps (effective data-rate) on the memory.

This Polaris 10 based product has been designed to be a match for the most popular Full HD and Wide Quad HD resolutions. Actually, it places a strong focus on 1440P gaming. AMD also markets VR everywhere, but likely a year from now the VR wind will have passed on to the 1% of people that will actually purchase VR. Memory wise, the Radeon RX 480 with 4GB would already be plenty, as 4GB will get you a long way. The tested model with 8GB though... as you can see, AMD includes one HDMI (2.0b) and three DisplayPort 1.4 (HDR ready) connectors. Unfortunately they stripped away the DVI monitor connector which in the end I feel is an incredibly poor choice. Especially in this price range there are a lot of monitor owners with just a DVI connector. 

Introduction Product Photos Product Photos Architecture and Specifications Hardware setup | Power consumption Graphics card temperatures Graphics Card Thermal Imaging Measurements (FLIR) Graphics card noise levels Test Environment & Equipment DX12: Rise of the Tomb Raider (2016) DX12: Hitman (2016) DX12: Total War: WARHAMMER DX12: Ashes Of The Singularity Benchmark OpenGL: DOOM (2016) DX11: Far Cry Primal DX11: Anno 2205 DX11: Fallout 4 DX11: Grand Theft Auto V DX11: Tom Clancy's The Division DX11: Thief DX11: The Witcher III Wild Hunt DX11: Battlefield Hardline DX11: Alien Isolation DX11 5K Ultra HD: Middle Earth Shadow Mordor DX11: 3DMark 11 DX11: 3DMark FireStrike (2013) Frame Time Experience Analysis Tomb Raider Frame Time Experience Analysis Hitman Absolution Frame Time Experience Analysis Thief Frame Time Experience Analysis Alien Isolation Frame Time Experience Analysis Tom Clancys The Division Frame Time Experience Analysis Far Cry Primal Frame Time Experience Analysis Shadow of Mordor Frame Time Experience Analysis WarHammer Overclocking The Graphics Card Final words and conclusion

36 pages 1 2 3 4 next »

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AMD Radeon RX 480 8GB Professional Application Results

Our German team developed a “crossover” workstation based on professional-class hardware. The CPU is a stock 3.7GHz Intel Xeon E3-1280 v5, which is the fastest Skylake-based Xeon E3. Because the system is fairly new, running recently-updated drivers, don't compare these results to numbers in our older stories.

As we know, many professional applications require certified hardware and workstation graphics cards. However, these days, companies like Autodesk use DirectX instead of OpenGL. This means that there are some workstation-class apps that run well on desktop graphics hardware for a lot less money. The following benchmarks provide a good overview of what works and what doesn’t.

Tom's Hardware Crossover WorkstationTest SystemDrivers
Intel Xeon E3-1280 v5 at 3.7GHz 4x 4GB Kingston DDR4-2133 ECC Asus P10 WS 2x Samsung SM863 (3D V-NAND) Seagate Constellation Server HDD

Windows 10 Enterprise (All Updates)

Catalyst Pro 15.301.2601Crimson 16.6.2 (Beta, Press Drivers)Quadro ODE 368.39 WHQL (ODE Drivers)

GeForce 368.39 WHQL

AutoCAD 3D Performance

It’s interesting to see a lot of similar-looking results in this benchmark. AMD’s Radeon RX 480 ends up right behind the R9 390X, represented by MSI's factory-overclocked R9 390X Gaming 8G.

In any case, all of the cards in our chart are bottlenecked by the Skylake-based Xeon processor. This is due to AutoCAD’s dependence on host processing IPC and the fact that it doesn’t scale very well with additional cores.

Maya 2013

From here on out, we're using the newest version of SPECviewperf12, a standard benchmark that includes a number of common professional applications and corresponding workloads. The current drivers provide some benefits to AMD cards, though the FirePro boards fare best. In contrast, all of Nvidia’s cards benefit.

Showcase 2013

Showcase 2013 is another DirectX title. The Radeon R9 390X enjoys a more substantial lead this time, and the GeForce GTX 970 ends up way ahead as well. It’s also notable that AMD's Radeon RX 480 loses to the FirePro W9100, which is just an R9 290X running at lower clock rates. At least the new card bests the FirePro W8100, the workstation version of AMD's R9 290.

Creo 2

This professional application usually doesn’t play well with consumer graphics cards. We decided to give it a try anyway. The results are as expected: AMD’s Radeon R9 390X and Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 980 lead the other desktop boards, while the GeForce GTX 970 gets left in the dust.

Catia V6 R2012

A similar picture emerges in our Catia benchmark, though AMD's desktop-class boards do outrun Nvidia's.

SolidWorks 2013

FirePro- and Quadro-specific driver optimizations massively affect the finishing order in our SolidWorks test. The GeForce boards in particular perform much worse than Nvidia's professional cards. Then again, why would anyone need to buy a professional graphics card if this wasn't the case?

Bottom Line

Generally speaking, AMD’s Radeon RX 480 falls in line behind the R9 390X at roughly the performance level of a factory-overclocked R9 390. Nvidia's equivalent cards win some tests and lose others, depending on the application in question. We do really like the gains provided by AMD's new Catalyst Pro, which posts double-digit improvements over the older driver in some cases.

MORE: Best Graphics Cards

MORE: Desktop GPU Performance Hierarchy Table

www.tomshardware.com

AMD Radeon RX 480 8GB review

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So here we'll have a look at GPU temperatures. First up, IDLE (desktop) temperatures.

 

Overall anything below 50 Degrees C is considered okay, anything below 40 Degrees C is very nice and below 30 Degrees C - CEWL. But what happens when we are gaming? We fire off an intense game-like application at the graphics card and measure the highest temperature of the GPU. 

 

So with the card fully stressed we kept monitoring temperatures and noted down the GPU temperature.

  • Radeon RX 480 - The temperature under heavy game stress for the card stabilized at a maximum of roughly 83 Degrees C. We note down the hottest GPU reading, not the average. The new card works with a temperature target much like Nvidia uses. The base value is set at 80 Degrees C. 

With today's graphics cards, please make sure your PC is well ventilated at all times, this will seriously help you on the overall GPU temperatures. As you can see below, once the card reaches its maximum temperature threshold of 80 Degrees it will start throttling on the boost frequency as well as voltages and fan RPM.

We are stressing with 3DMark FireStrike scene 1 looped. As you can see, the GPU clocks down 66 MHz (variable) to be able to meet the temperature target. 

Introduction Product Photos Product Photos Architecture and Specifications Hardware setup | Power consumption Graphics card temperatures Graphics Card Thermal Imaging Measurements (FLIR) Graphics card noise levels Test Environment & Equipment DX12: Rise of the Tomb Raider (2016) DX12: Hitman (2016) DX12: Total War: WARHAMMER DX12: Ashes Of The Singularity Benchmark OpenGL: DOOM (2016) DX11: Far Cry Primal DX11: Anno 2205 DX11: Fallout 4 DX11: Grand Theft Auto V DX11: Tom Clancy's The Division DX11: Thief DX11: The Witcher III Wild Hunt DX11: Battlefield Hardline DX11: Alien Isolation DX11 5K Ultra HD: Middle Earth Shadow Mordor DX11: 3DMark 11 DX11: 3DMark FireStrike (2013) Frame Time Experience Analysis Tomb Raider Frame Time Experience Analysis Hitman Absolution Frame Time Experience Analysis Thief Frame Time Experience Analysis Alien Isolation Frame Time Experience Analysis Tom Clancys The Division Frame Time Experience Analysis Far Cry Primal Frame Time Experience Analysis Shadow of Mordor Frame Time Experience Analysis WarHammer Overclocking The Graphics Card Final words and conclusion

36 pages «

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